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Hello There :)

#3
What are your recommendations when it comes to Quadcopters? Do I really need a GPS with it or the usual RC controller will do? Looking at either EACHINE GPS Drone or Cheerson CX40.
 
#5
More Photography and video shooting actually. Not really the racing type. Just for a bit of fun with the kids. You got some wonderful videos there! Amazing
 

Merv

Well-known member
#7
Do I really need a GPS with it or the usual RC controller will do?
No, you don't really need GPS, a quad will fly just fine without GPS.

However GPS is really really nice. I've got a Phantom P3P, with GPS on, no matter what the wind is doing, it will just hag there. This will allow you to concentrate on the picture, not on fighting the wind. If you plan on going some distance from takeoff, GPS will always point the way home. It's a helpless feeling to be low on battery and not know which way home is. Even though you don't "need" GPS, I would not fly mine with out it.

Like @CarolineTyler said, It comes down to how do you want to fly. The race and free stile guys & gals generally don't use GPS but the video and photo guys & gals generally do.
 
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FDS

Well-known member
#8
If you just want a photography drone and can live with short range and only 1080p video something small and self flying like the Ryze Tello is a good place to start, they are relatively cheap and basic. There’s a lot of consumer photo drones around now, there’s lots of YouTube channels that test them. Kids can fly these smaller, less powerful platforms quite safely and some get under the 250g registration limit that many countries seem to have settled on.
If you want more features and better video with a compact size and major manufacturer support a second hand DJI spark is hard to beat price wise.
The sort of drones most people here fly are almost entirely pilot controlled and designed with performance in mind, with not so much emphasis on automation. You really fly those, they are not a photography or static camera platform.
With restrictive regulations everywhere it might pay to look at how much hassle with registration etc you want before you get set on buying as well, check the rules where you live and look at where you are allowed to fly.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#10
Hubsan stuff is usually OK and parts/spare batteries are widely available. Parrot started consumer drones way back in 2010, they released the first one, before DJI. Their stuff is usually good too.
Both those drones will require licences to use and are pretty expensive.