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Help needed

#1
Hello guys. Please I need help as I am new to building RC planes.
1. What does the mm in electric ducted fans stand for?
2. I would like to build a twin engine airliner using 2 small ducted fans.
3. What electric components do i need to purchase and what website can i purchase them online?
4. I can think of the following
a. 2 electric ducted fans
b.Battery
c.Transmitter
d.receiver

5. Please what did I forget to include in the list
6.How do i ensure that the power and voltage rating of the ducted fans, battery, transmitter and receiver are all compatible with each other

I will really appreciate if answers are provided to my questions. Pleeeeeaaaase help me. I need to get airborne

Thanks so much guys
 

Merv

Well-known member
#2
1. What does the mm in electric ducted fans stand for?
Millimeters
5. Please what did I forget to include in the list
You'll 2 ECS's (Electronic Speed Controllers) to drive the EDF's. Some servos and possible some extension wires.

6.How do i ensure that the power and voltage rating of the ducted fans, battery, transmitter and receiver are all compatible with each other
Start with the motor, how many amps will it draw, make sure the ESC is rated a bit more than the motor is asking for. Then make sure the battery can supply the needs of both ESC's.

Use the same brand of Tx & Rx.

It would be a good idea to start with something slower than an EDF, they tend to go pretty fast. Start with a trainer plane save the EDF for later.
 
Last edited:

mrjdstewart

Well-known member
#3
be cautious, EDF's are not the most powerful things out there. they are expensive, draw lots of amps, and don't provide a lot of thrust vs. size. you have to be very careful from the beginning with the size and weight of your design.

good luck,

me :cool:
 
#4
Millimeters
You'll 2 ECS's (Electronic Speed Controllers) to drive the EDF's. Some servos and possible some extension wires.



Start with the motor, how many amps will it draw, make sure the ESC is rated a bit more than the motor is asking for. Then make sure the battery can supply the needs of both ESC's.

Use the same brand of Tx & Rx.

It would be a good idea to start with something slower than an EDF, they tend to go pretty fast. Start with a trainer plane save the EDF for later.
Thanks so much
 
#5
Millimeters
You'll 2 ECS's (Electronic Speed Controllers) to drive the EDF's. Some servos and possible some extension wires.



Start with the motor, how many amps will it draw, make sure the ESC is rated a bit more than the motor is asking for. Then make sure the battery can supply the needs of both ESC's.

Use the same brand of Tx & Rx.

It would be a good idea to start with something slower than an EDF, they tend to go pretty fast. Start with a trainer plane save the EDF for later.
Millimeters
You'll 2 ECS's (Electronic Speed Controllers) to drive the EDF's. Some servos and possible some extension wires.



Start with the motor, how many amps will it draw, make sure the ESC is rated a bit more than the motor is asking for. Then make sure the battery can supply the needs of both ESC's.

Use the same brand of Tx & Rx.

It would be a good idea to start with something slower than an EDF, they tend to go pretty fast. Start with a trainer plane save the EDF for later.
Thanks so much. Please is the millimeter the diameter of the fan?
 

jaredstrees

Well-known member
#7
By the rating, do you mean amp rating or voltage rating pls
Both. Motors and ESC's only operate within a certain voltage range. Some have a greater range than others. All motors and ESC's have a maximum amp rating as well. So you need to make sure that your battery isn't too high a voltage for that equipment, but also that it won't exceed the amp rating under load.

So you can have a 30 amp esc that takes 2 to 4 cells. So in this instance, the lowest voltage allowed is 7.4v (2 cell), and the highest is 14.4v (4 cell). As long as your motor doesn't pull more that 30amps at most ant is also rated for 2 to 4 cell you should be good.

Someone else will probably chime in with a better explanation, but I believe that is the short version.

And a 50mm fan has a diameter of 50 mm.
 

d8veh

Well-known member
#8
I like to encourage people with projects like this, but I have to tell you about a vital missing ingredient: You have to be able to fly it, which probably means taking a few steps back and learning to fly on a beginners plane, which you will crash many times.
 

jaredstrees

Well-known member
#9
I agree. I crashed EVERY flight while learning. And I used trainers like the TT and FT Flyer. Besides, EDF's are power hungry, you'll only get a couple minute flight times. Not the best for learning. It's hard to learn how to fly a plane on that short a flight. Not to mention they tend to go faster, and unless you have some stick time the reflexes might not be there. There are plenty of other reasons, and I agree EDF planes are cool, but start with something that will give you a better chance of success.

Good luck whatever route you choose, and let us know how you do!
 

Merv

Well-known member
#10
Thanks so much. Please is the millimeter the diameter of the fan?
Yes, millimeter is the diameter of the fan. Not all fans are the same, they can have different blade counts. A 12 blade fan will pull more amps than a 6 blade fan of the same diameter.

By the rating, do you mean amp rating or voltage rating pls
I was referring to AMP rating. The amps the motor uses, should be less than the ESC can supply, which should be less that the battery can provide. If the motor draws more amps than the ESC or battery can provide, you will burn something out.

So your question about voltage is a bit more complicated. All of our motors have a KV rating, that is the revolutions per volt. Take 1000 kv as an example, on 3S (12.6v) it will spin at 12,600 rpm, on 4S (16.8v) it will spin at 16,800 rpm. The faster a given fan or propeller spins will cause the motor to draw more amps. It will also produce more thrust. If you have a motor rated at 30 amps with a fan or propeller that causes the motor to draw say 29 amps on 3S. If you put that setup on 4S you will burn out the motor. You would need to use a smaller fan or propeller to operate on 4S.
 
#11
Yes, millimeter is the diameter of the fan. Not all fans are the same, they can have different blade counts. A 12 blade fan will pull more amps than a 6 blade fan of the same diameter.



I was referring to AMP rating. The amps the motor uses, should be less than the ESC can supply, which should be less that the battery can provide. If the motor draws more amps than the ESC or battery can provide, you will burn something out.

So your question about voltage is a bit more complicated. All of our motors have a KV rating, that is the revolutions per volt. Take 1000 kv as an example, on 3S (12.6v) it will spin at 12,600 rpm, on 4S (16.8v) it will spin at 16,800 rpm. The faster a given fan or propeller spins will cause the motor to draw more amps. It will also produce more thrust. If you have a motor rated at 30 amps with a fan or propeller that causes the motor to draw say 29 amps on 3S. If you put that setup on 4S you will burn out the motor. You would need to use a smaller fan or propeller to operate on 4S.
Thanks so much for your detailed explanation. Please what type of fan supplies more thrust, a fan with 12 thin blades or a fan with 4 thick blades giving that both fans are of the same diameter, which of the two fans will supply more thrust.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#12
Thanks so much for your detailed explanation. Please what type of fan supplies more thrust, a fan with 12 thin blades or a fan with 4 thick blades giving that both fans are of the same diameter, which of the two fans will supply more thrust.

12 blade fans give more thrust, also take more amps.