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HELP!!!

#1
Hello there! I live at 7000FT elevation and all my FTplanes fly like a rock... my FT bushwacked weighs 490 grams W/O battery and its brushless motor is a hexTronik DT750 Brushless Outrunner 750kv and 35amp esc i also fly with a zippy 2200mah 20c.. adding more power up here is a must but i was thinking of making the wings larger... is there anyway to make the wing larger without making it feel like a completely different plane?? THANK SO MUCH!
 

dpalmer146

Old Dawg - New Tricks
#2
Scoodles93,
I also live and fly at high altitude. I am at 6400 ft. I have found that you need more power, a bigger prop and adding a couple of inches to the wingspan tends to help. Also, building light is a must! You will also find out that flight times will be less. I find that bigger is better. So if you are a scratch builder, then scale up any plans. I did find that my Storch was a very good flier, but don't expect it to float like it does for the FT guys who fly down around sea level.
 

IFlyRCstuff

Flyer Of Many Things
#3
You will want to get a bigger prop on it for more power. as for upscaling, it will be more floaty due to science (2x the wing=4x the lift)
 
#5
At ground/lower levels going bigger results in going more docile, it results in slower responses ..
At high levels this may not be noticed to much..
Simply making the model bigger may work, but if the all up weight goes up in proportion to the bigger wing area you wont actually achieve a better performance

scaling up.. so dont scale it all up , first try increasing the wing chord, then the span.. remember that this is adding more weight, so some more power will also be needed.. extra area is needed in thin air to get the same lift..

power itself, the thrust of your setup will be lower, with the air being thinner ....So you will need to use bigger props than you would at low altitudes to get the thrust back up to what the model needs...

get a watt meter.. try bigger props but you must keep the draw in the spec range for your motor.. if that doest get the thrust up enough go up on the motor size..

Ideal performance ... aim at over a 1:1 thrust to weight for all models with higher ratios preferred... 2:1 is my target for any model,,, the throttle is always there to keep the model in check..

good luck...
 

IFlyRCstuff

Flyer Of Many Things
#6
At ground/lower levels going bigger results in going more docile, it results in slower responses ..
At high levels this may not be noticed to much..
Simply making the model bigger may work, but if the all up weight goes up in proportion to the bigger wing area you wont actually achieve a better performance




good luck...
fortunately foamboard is extremely light, so i personally wouldn't bother with the power upgrade if it isnt flying where its about to stall. as for being more docile, i think that should be fine until he/she wants more
 

ftwingnut

WWI Flying Ace
#7
Another thing that I would add to the great advice already given, is, go with a lighter battery. A 2200 is a heavy battery for the Bushwacker. Try a 1300 and see how much better it flies. True, you won't get as long of a flight time, but with half the battery weight that it has to carry around, the flight time will only be a little shorter, and the flight performance will be much better. I always say, start out light, then increase if you need to as you get more flights in. Many of my FT models will start out with a 1000 or 1300 so that I am not struggling to test fly a heavy plane.

Just my 2 cents.