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I am building my first FT speedbuild Kit! Need help on what electronics I should get.

#1
Hi,

I am planing to build either the FT mini mustang or the Mini Guinea. I already have servos so I don't need to buy that. I need help deciding which plane I should build first, which one would be easer to build, which would be easer to fly, etc. I also need a list of everything I will need from start to finish.

I appreciate any help.
 
#2
Hi,

I am planing to build either the FT mini mustang or the Mini Guinea. I already have servos so I don't need to buy that. I need help deciding which plane I should build first, which one would be easer to build, which would be easer to fly, etc. I also need a list of everything I will need from start to finish.

I appreciate any help.
I would say the mini mustang would be easier to fly for sure. If you plop in a a-pack motor and 12-amp esc you will be in good business
 

SlingShot

Maneuvering With Purpose
#5
#8
The Mini Mustang will be easier to build, while the Mini Guinea should be easier to fly. As stated earlier, an A pack setup or Twin A pack (for the Guinea) setup will work. If it were mine I would go with the F pack and reduce throttle until I was comfortable. The F pack is more versatile.

https://store.flitetest.com/flite-test-power-pack-a-minis-flt-3001/p674262

https://store.flitetest.com/flite-test-power-pack-f-flt-3010/p674271

Great, thanks!

Do I have to buy the power pack or can I buy everything individually, I have 9g servos so I don't want to buy more if I don't have to(I am on a tight budget). Will 9g servos even work with the planes?
 

Arcfyre

Well-known member
#9
If you're familiar with airplane electronics, there is no reason why you can't buy the parts separately on sites like hobbyking.

Keep in mind that the guinea will require two motors and ESCs, increasing the cost of the build. The mini mustang is a good plane as I said, but I'd steer away from it for now until you have some experience. It's very fast, very small, very manueverable, and easy to lose track of.

As @mayan suggested the tiny trainer is a good beginner model, easy to fly and I think the kit is cheap too. It's also fairly simple to scratch build which can also save you some money if you go that route.
 

FDS

Active member
#10
You don’t need to buy another kit to make another plane. Printing the plans and then spending a couple of hours cutting out the parts is much cheaper than buying a speedbuild kit, most only need two or three sheets of foamboard.
The tools required are just a steel rule and disposable knife, no more than $10.
Most of the minis use a 5g pack. If you are having to ask which electronics to use I would go safe and buy the power pack, if you are in the US it’s far easier to do that for your first build. That way the key items that need to match, namely the motor, esc and prop, are all correctly matched and all you need is a battery.
 
#11
You don’t need to buy another kit to make another plane. Printing the plans and then spending a couple of hours cutting out the parts is much cheaper than buying a speedbuild kit, most only need two or three sheets of foamboard.
The tools required are just a steel rule and disposable knife, no more than $10.
Most of the minis use a 5g pack. If you are having to ask which electronics to use I would go safe and buy the power pack, if you are in the US it’s far easier to do that for your first build. That way the key items that need to match, namely the motor, esc and prop, are all correctly matched and all you need is a battery.
It is all great advice, but it is not like I can just go on FliteTest.com and buy anything I need. I am 13 and don't have full-time job so I don't have a lot of money.
 
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FDS

Active member
#12
That’s why I said to scratch build your trainer out the dollar store. None of the foamboard or tools are off the web store, you don’t need the waterproof board, sure it’s nice but far from essential.
You won’t save much buying potentially the wrong motors, esc and prop elsewhere, plus putting too large servos in the fuselage will upset the CG vs using the right size for your airframe.
 

SlingShot

Maneuvering With Purpose
#13
Great, thanks!

Do I have to buy the power pack or can I buy everything individually, I have 9g servos so I don't want to buy more if I don't have to(I am on a tight budget). Will 9g servos even work with the planes?
Of course you can. I reference the Power Packs for easy comparison. Completely up you as to how and where you buy. Fly well :cool:
 
#14
Not flown the mini mustang but would imagine it will be a steep learning curve moving up to that from the F949.
I've just finished making a tiny trainer and simple cub for my brother over the last week , he has only ever flown the WLtoys F949 too, I'd say the simple cub is the better plane out of the two to fly as it feels a bit more responsive compared with the tiny trainer.
Good luck :)
 
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#15
Not flown the mini mustang but would imagine it will be a steep learning curve moving up to that from the F949.
I've just finished making a tiny trainer and simple cub for my brother over the last week , he has only ever flown the WLtoys F949 too, I'd say the simple cub is the better plane out of the two to fly as it feels a bit more responsive compared to with the tiny trainer.
Good luck :)
yeah, I like the look of the Simple Cub better than the Tiny Trainer anyway.

If I went with the Simple Cub, would I be able to preform basic acrobatics like loops, rolls, inverted flight, knifes edge, etc?
 
#16
yeah, I like the look of the Simple Cub better than the Tiny Trainer anyway.

If I went with the Simple Cub, would I be able to preform basic acrobatics like loops, rolls, inverted flight, knifes edge, etc?
You definitely could! I have flown a simple cub and loved it. Now I am building my own from a kit. My friend is able to hover his and do tumbles and lots of aerobatics with ease.
 

mayan

Well-known member
#17
You could do tricks with the tiny trainer as well. I have flown both the tiny trainer and the simple Cub and prefer the Tiny Trainer. Personally preference. Also I think that if the budget is your issue the Tiny Trainer electronics are overall cheaper.
 
#19
You could do tricks with the tiny trainer as well. I have flown both the tiny trainer and the simple Cub and prefer the Tiny Trainer. Personally preference. Also I think that if the budget is your issue the Tiny Trainer electronics are overall cheaper.
Why do you prefer the tiny trainer?
 

mayan

Well-known member
#20
Why do you prefer the tiny trainer?
Because it a very forgiving plane. Because it’s easy to control and it’s electronics are some what cheaper. Think of it as a car if you buy a big car it costs more than a smaller one. It’s also great for beigners because it allows you to go from 2 channel glider to 4 channel aerobatic plane. I personally started of with the Simple Cub and didn’t manage to get it to fly. I was bumped but didn’t give up then tried the Tiny Trainer and had started to see some success. I started with a 2 channel setup and practiced basic elevator and rudder control. Then went to 3 channels and was able to get some air time. When I realized that I can use up a whole batttery without crashing I went to a 4 channel setup. Today I feel comfortable trying new models including the Simple Cub. But I know now many things that I wouldn’t have learned if I would have kept fighting to get the Simple Cub in the air. Others might have even gave up completely. I recently tried to fly the Simple Cub again and still had limited success with it. It seems like and easy plane to fly but it’s not that easy. Another thought about the tiny trainer is that it is easy to repair and would also cost less to repair because you would need less foam in the first place. If you place your parts smartly on the foam board you will only need 1.5 sheets of foam to build the plane. You can read more about my ongoing experience here: Hobby Newbie Learning Diary; Family Included!