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Help! Motor shaft bent in crash

#1
Hi, I am beginner rc flyer, and I have crashed my plane, and also repaired it, but the motor shaft has bent slightly. It doesn't look bad, and its even hard to notice. When motor is not turning, but when it is, the end of the shaft is moving like half of an millimeter. I dont think its dangerous, but also I don't think its good, so is there reason for changing motor/shaft and can it cause damage to vehicle? My model is Panda Multiplex.
 

FastCrash45

Well-known member
#2
Hi, I am beginner rc flyer, and I have crashed my plane, and also repaired it, but the motor shaft has bent slightly. It doesn't look bad, and its even hard to notice. When motor is not turning, but when it is, the end of the shaft is moving like half of an millimeter. I dont think its dangerous, but also I don't think its good, so is there reason for changing motor/shaft and can it cause damage to vehicle? My model is Panda Multiplex.
It's going to run for awhile but that vibration will eventually destroy the motor and could do the same to the receiver and depending on the quality of the components it could also harm your speed control. I just had my motor destroy itself. The shaft broke where the bell attaches. The hub, prop, and bell sailed off to the wild blue yonder. Probably be safe for a few flights but you will soon have problems. Most shafts on most motors are replaceable. I would replace it if possible ASAP. Even a small plane at slow speeds can do serious damage in the right conditions. Much better to be safe than sorry.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#6
Here is how I make my own replacement shafts.

Finding the correct size of stock materials is the most difficult part of the process. I have had success using music wire, nails and suitable stock from eBay. I have found these 3.17 mm shafts . I just received some today they’re look like they will work fine. All you will need to do is grind or file a flat spot for the motor bell to engage.

I also used this stainless steel stock, it comes in 3, 4, 5, 6 & 8 mm. With this material, you will need to grind a slot for the clip. I chuck it in a drill and use a Dremel with the cheap cut off wheel to cut a slot. Don’t use the heavy duty wheel, it’s too thick. Be sure to wear safety glasses. Secure the drill, spin it up and with a steady hand cut the slot. On my first few attempts I cut the grove too deep. Just cut it off and try again. The Dremel also work great to grind the flat. The setup takes longer than the process, I will make several at one time.

For me this is a quick and easy way to breath new life into a motor. Like anything else it will be awkward at first but will become easier the more you do it You might want to order some extra E-Clips also.