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Old people: how do you deal with all this tiny stuff?

#1
(Rant on): cant see it,
drop it on the floor, can't find it,
fingers are too clumsy to assemble it
(Rant off)
Has to be some sort of box of tricks I haven't found yet, or am I forced to concede?
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
Mentor
#3
I am also one of the "Failing eyesight" older members.
First thing you need is a good pair of spectacles to be able to see what you are working on.
A raised edge around the work table can stop things rolling off of the table and onto the floor.
Finding things on the floor can be a problem but I use a stick with a ball of packing tape on one end, (sticky side out), and a magnet on the other. A determined wipe of the floor with the end of the stick almost always finds what I am looking for , (and sometimes things I did not even know were missing.

As for the fiddly assembly try a decent pair of tweezers or a range of tweezers with different bend angles, (you will soon develop a favorite).

A couple of shallow plastic trays for the bits to be used can keep everything you need in one spot during assembly.

Just what works for me!

Have fun!
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
Mentor
#6
Makes it big, Makes it bright
Started using one a long time ago repairing two-way radios.
Each year the parts got smaller.

But dropping it on the floor? Always buy spares.
You have really suffered in your life, (I should know I spent too many years repairing SMD LSI radios. Portables were the worst).

Have fun!
 
#7
Thanks for the replies.
Got the SMD toolkit out, stole my son's micro EMT forceps, turned on enough light to get sunburned. Gaffers taped everything to the table.
Can't buy the old Luxor magnifying lights new anymore, will have to find a set of dentist exam spectacles in my prescription.
Only took 3 hours to put the micro servo arm screw back on, getting faster.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#8
I laid out a microfiber towel on my build table when I'm doing things with screws; the towel tends to catch the screws so they don't roll all over the place. It's not perfect, but it definitely helps stop a screw from bouncing and rolling off the table, into the carpet, never to be seen again unless I step on it barefoot just right.

I'm going to steal my dad's magnifying lamp the next time I'm down visiting him, though; he never uses it anymore, and since I do miniatures and rock painting as well, it helps me to see when I need to get some nice detail in certain areas.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#9
I agree with @sprzout, always put any kind of old towel down if working with small parts. On the workbench, the towel will absorb the bounce and keep the part from going off the workbench. In the field, the towel will keep the part out of grass.
 

mayan

Well-known member
#11
Finding things on the floor can be a problem but I use a stick with a ball of packing tape on one end, (sticky side out), and a magnet on the other. A determined wipe of the floor with the end of the stick almost always finds what I am looking for , (and sometimes things I did not even know were missing.
That's a really good idea.
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
Mentor
#12
Granny glasses, hemostats, and the neighbors 2 year old.

Glasses to see.
Hemostats to hold tiny parts.
Neighbors kid to find any dropped parts as at that age they want to taste EVERYTHING and find the smallest strangest things with ease.

Could probably try a few of them sticky mouse trap pads on yhe work bench to catch parts.
 

daxian

Active member
#13
lol ...i sometimes find i need 2 pair of glasses ...tried one or two magnifiers with lights, but they make things worse, may be time for a new prescription !! agree with the magnet for dropped in the carpet stuff !!!!!
 

L Edge

Active member
#16
Anytime you work with small parts, go to the kitchen and grab one of the clear 1 gallon plastic (Ziploc) bags. Put your item, tools and your hands inside the clear bag and take it apart/together without loosing anything.
Even changing gears in the small size servos with them tiny screws. Zip it up and nothing is lost. Works for me.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#18
I agree with @sprzout, always put any kind of old towel down if working with small parts. On the workbench, the towel will absorb the bounce and keep the part from going off the workbench. In the field, the towel will keep the part out of grass.
It doesn't ALWAYS help, but it's saved a screw more than once, and that's all I need. :)