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Seen the New E-flite V-22® Osprey?

Like It?


  • Total voters
    10

CarolineTyler

Well-known member
#3
Yes, the rotors are too small, and the cheater fan is a shame but it does look cool and at least you won't accidentally break your rotas by switching to forward flight on the ground
 

FastCrash45

Well-known member
#7
I like it because it's different. That being said I don't like the cheater fan and I'd really want to check out how well it changes from vertical to forward flight. Since the rotors are so small I see problems with it losing altitude quickly when changing from up to forward.
 

F106DeltaDart

Well-known member
#11
I saw the photos online and I don't like the looks of it. The rotor blades are too small and they're using a 3rd cheater motor for stability. I'd love to get my hands on an Osprey from http://www.rotormast.com/en/, but they are crazy expensive.
I was thinking the same thing. Even just a clear canopy would have improved the looks. I actually am planning on buying the rotormast model later this year. I've been staring at that model since I was a kid, and I think its probably time to bite the bullet and get around to it. Plus, the builder is another local Bell employee, so I can bug him if I have any issues.
 

kilroy07

Well-known member
#12
:unsure:
Not sure the cool factor cancels out the price tag. Might have considered it at 1/2 to 2/3rds the cost.

It looks “okay” (better in the air than on ground...)

I have seen some variable pitch prop setups but they seem setup for lighter indoor flying. Most of the diy transformers use a third prop/fan... I think you would need variable pitch (or some really tuned in motors!) I have seen some bi-coptors co I know the software/hardware is there (or darn close.)...

Maybe we should challenge FT to build a “true” transition aircraft...
 

kilroy07

Well-known member
#13
So this happened yesterday...
Our local hobby shop is closing down (I think they overextended themselves...)
But as sad as that is (and it is sad...) I found this.
IMG_9322[1].JPG NTQY4508[1].JPG

A pair of replacement wings to fix a bad glue job and I've got myself an Osprey!!!
(I wouldn't have paid $220 for it, but I'll sure as heck pay $60!!)
 

L Edge

Well-known member
#14
:unsure:
Not sure the cool factor cancels out the price tag. Might have considered it at 1/2 to 2/3rds the cost.

It looks “okay” (better in the air than on ground...)

I have seen some variable pitch prop setups but they seem setup for lighter indoor flying. Most of the diy transformers use a third prop/fan... I think you would need variable pitch (or some really tuned in motors!) I have seen some bi-coptors co I know the software/hardware is there (or darn close.)...

Maybe we should challenge FT to build a “true” transition aircraft...
Unless your familiar with the hardware/software it would be impossible. The reason for the fan is to "help" pitch problems in hover as well as in the transition in/out of forward flight. It's even harder with a bi setup rather than tri. I found that out the hard way. The X-Vert is a Horizon's attempt to get a bicopter going.
 

L Edge

Well-known member
#16
I’ve got one of those too! 🤣

The Osprey is encouraging because it has separate escs (tuning might still be an issue, but if this one dies... I might try to scale it up a bit.)
Figured out how to beat the wind in vertical condition. Being a windsurfer, used the tack method of getting the X Vert upwind of you. You start off going about 60 degrees from the wind and move forward off to right(wing). Tack for a distance and quickly rotate the X-vert so it is now 60 degrees off the wind(left wing) and go across to the left. Repeat and it will move forward.

To land, tack (let it move back) until your real close. Quickly rotate X-Vert so it is parallel to wind and set it down. Practice make perfect and you can land it in front of you. Just like sailing. You need to be good with the rudder/throttle in order do it.

You need a control board with gyro/acc to handle hovering. Engine RPM too sensitive without FC board. Doing a bi-copter.



 
Last edited:

CheckMySix

Active member
#17
So this happened yesterday...
Our local hobby shop is closing down (I think they overextended themselves...)
But as sad as that is (and it is sad...) I found this.
View attachment 138758 View attachment 138757

A pair of replacement wings to fix a bad glue job and I've got myself an Osprey!!!
(I wouldn't have paid $220 for it, but I'll sure as heck pay $60!!)
It's a fun little bird and resilient as hell too. Think I stalled it with a low throttle in plane mode, winged over and dirt napped it. Little hot and CA glue and she was back in the air. Came out of a loop in acro mode the other day and the think the flight controller freaked out just as I was coming out of it. Broke the plastic Nancell mount so I took it apart, CA glued the broken piece and darned if she hasn't been flying great since. A couple tips...
Go hands off when transitioning from heli to plane mode and just let her do her thing.
Never fly backwards very fast. Just isn't design for it.
Keep at least half throttle in plane mode. Apparently she'll still wing tip stall even with a prop on the end...lol.
Never go from heli straight to acro mode. That bit me. Let her transition for maybe 5 seconds and then you can go.
She isn't a real acro 3D bird so you can get in trouble in acro mode. You can loop and roll but that's about it really. Fun to take up to the park with a couple batteries. You'll get about 4 minutes going from liftoff to plane but heli mode will suck down the battery. Have another prop spinning after all.
Have fun with it. I am. Nice little thing to fly while big birds are cooling down. 😋😁
 

tamuct01

Active member
#19
For what reason could that thing cost $1,800, got dang...
I can understand the Rotormast price tag. You're getting 2 premium 450 size helicopters, custom-molded foam and plastic bits, and a custom flight controller. I'm working on my own rendition using a couple of cheap 450 helis over here: https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/bell-boeing-v-22-project.58632/

I had a flying bicopter before the virus shut everything down. I've spent the time in CAD drawing up the tilt mechanism and now I'm waiting for shipments of tubing and hardware to complete the mechanism.
 

CheckMySix

Active member
#20
For what reason could that thing cost $1,800, got dang...
Cheater? Not sure that's an accurate label. Consider the fact that like 75% of total weight is in the nose with the battery...I think it's pretty slick engineering. She flies wonderfully. The flight controller is locked in. It's a hoot. Can run down the street to a small park and get a couple flights in before work and/or at lunch. Can't pull that off with the 70mm EDF F16 or even the Spitfire. Just ordered the Eflite A10! Can't freaking wait. Looks like one bone girl!