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SHUTTLE'S RELEASE SYSTEMS (A 3 FUR 1 POSSIBILITY)

L Edge

Active member
#1
After Jim W designed his system, decided to add my scratch design to the mix. Yes, Jim's point about a 2 point hold system is well taken and I had the same problem.

I am hoping some other person will take up the challange and use FT Guinea Pig so others can have the same fun as I have.

Scratch built my own shuttle and my biggest problem was how to clear tail. First determine the CG, now went flying by the seat of my pants on a high stool in the back of truck going 25mph. Tilted the shuttle's angle(about CG) until it felt it had a good amount of lift. Purpose is to clear the tail. That is seat of the pants flying, even used it for an oblique wing design. Use servo to unhook(gear switch)

3 FUR 1 MISSION:
1) Using 2 pilots, 1 for transport, 1 for flying down Shuttle.
2) Don't have 2 people, purchase Guillow's Space Shuttle, weight nose and one wing with tape, and after release will circle down.
3) Use modified release system, purchase Guillow's Jetfire glider and have a ball. Go up 400ft and release on a hot summer day, and you will lose 50% of your glider's with updraft. Real cool to see it fly away.

P1010097.JPG

If there is enough interest, I will layout the details for the rigs. I really want someone to try using the Guinea Pig and make it work and produce drawings. Good way to support FT group.

Here is the release of shuttle using a tail camera and at 1:28 (upper left corner) it comes back into view. Chose to land off runway since you noticed the other pilot has a little trouble of smoothness. It landed upwind of the runway as you can see in video.
Frame is made out of wire clothes hanger and soldered for stiffness.




Smaller Space shuttle costs $9.99 and gliders are available at Guillow.com, Any questions? P1010097.JPG
 
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jfaleo1

Junior Member
#2
For what it is worth I did this MANY years ago with a similar rig (looks like it works well Kudos), I recommend you either use the parabolic release method they used on the real thing, or try what we did and slow to a near stall and release as it goes nose over. The shuttle is not stable at high Angle of attack and high speed. It tends to wake blanket the vertical stab leading to flat spins that are unrecoverable. Experimentation is what its all about though so good luck. I would be interested in seeing more detail of your launch rig, I may need it on my SS2 project.
 

L Edge

Active member
#3
For what it is worth I did this MANY years ago with a similar rig (looks like it works well Kudos), I recommend you either use the parabolic release method they used on the real thing, or try what we did and slow to a near stall and release as it goes nose over. The shuttle is not stable at high Angle of attack and high speed. It tends to wake blanket the vertical stab leading to flat spins that are unrecoverable. Experimentation is what its all about though so good luck. I would be interested in seeing more detail of your launch rig, I may need it on my SS2 project.
Did initial project in 2012, your right about release angle, that is why it was set at 17 degrees. Shuttle is very lightweight(Depron) and slight nose down to keep glide path shallow. That way, it always recovers.
Shuttle has small carbon rod glued in where a metal servo(has a notch cut out) and moves forward to lock front of shuttle. Looking at above picture, see the wire that extends out at aft end that goes out, bends up 90's and then aft. To prevent fluttering, this wire sits between the elevons that has a wider gap than normal. Hence, the shuttle is rigid and no fluttering occurs.
 

jfaleo1

Junior Member
#4
Looks like a decent system.

We used a slot in the bottom of the shuttle, a tab on the platform went into the slot and a piece of music wire guided by a plastic tube would pull out of the hole on the tab when full up elevator was applied to the shuttle. Shuttle pilot had control of the launch. It was under enough tension to hold straight but not enough to bind the micro servos. Keep in mind this was 33-34 years ago, our shuttle was balsa and monokote, and the drop plane was a 1/6 scale Sig J-3 Cub (first drop), or a .60 size sport plane called a "Protender". The description of the shuttle's flight by a bystander was, "Wow, that flies like a dead sparrow." which was accurate.
 

L Edge

Active member
#5
Looks like a decent system.

We used a slot in the bottom of the shuttle, a tab on the platform went into the slot and a piece of music wire guided by a plastic tube would pull out of the hole on the tab when full up elevator was applied to the shuttle. Shuttle pilot had control of the launch. It was under enough tension to hold straight but not enough to bind the micro servos. Keep in mind this was 33-34 years ago, our shuttle was balsa and monokote, and the drop plane was a 1/6 scale Sig J-3 Cub (first drop), or a .60 size sport plane called a "Protender". The description of the shuttle's flight by a bystander was, "Wow, that flies like a dead sparrow." which was accurate.
Too bad it wasn't a lipo battery. Nicad's were very heavy during those days. Gliders suffered unless they were very large in size.