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Sucking less is cool

#1
So, I had a breakthrough over the long weekend. Having to learn with no one volunteering to buddy box me I've been all simulator and "here goes nothing". I've been crashing in as little as 10 seconds laughing and asking myself what happened there? Sometimes just butsting a prop, other times tearing stuff up to the point that a lot of packing tape, popsicle sticks and hot glue was involved!

Well, this weekend I managed to completely drain several batteries before trashing a particular plane for the day! I've got to where I really like the Bloody Brit and while it is worse for the wair I can see building another one, a better one.
I'm liking the Versa as well, I think I will build another flying wing as well, perhaps a Spear next time?

I am really liking this whole foamboard thing where a major crash can be as little as a prop and some hot glue to repair and then only $4-6 for a whole new airframe when I've crash it one time too many.
 

jaredstrees

Well-known member
#3
So, I had a breakthrough over the long weekend. Having to learn with no one volunteering to buddy box me I've been all simulator and "here goes nothing". I've been crashing in as little as 10 seconds laughing and asking myself what happened there? Sometimes just butsting a prop, other times tearing stuff up to the point that a lot of packing tape, popsicle sticks and hot glue was involved!

Well, this weekend I managed to completely drain several batteries before trashing a particular plane for the day! I've got to where I really like the Bloody Brit and while it is worse for the wair I can see building another one, a better one.
I'm liking the Versa as well, I think I will build another flying wing as well, perhaps a Spear next time?

I am really liking this whole foamboard thing where a major crash can be as little as a prop and some hot glue to repair and then only $4-6 for a whole new airframe when I've crash it one time too many.
Awesome to hear! Glad all your work is paying off. When it clicks it's a great feeling.
 

Headbang

Well-known member
#5
Great news!, congratulations.


For me the simulator messes with your depth perception, its really hard to get 3D out of a 2D screen. The other thing I noticed, the simulator planes are perfect, they just fly better than mine do. Perfect CG, thrust angels, throws ect.
So yesterday I got the new HTC Vive I got for Christmas going. First thing on my list to do was fire up Real Flight 8. OMG! It changes everything! Perception is like being at the field! At one point I lost control of the AJ Slick I was using for testing, it went for my head, I physically ducked and put my arms up to protect my head! Next up was the big pitts python, hovering right next to me, it was just like show boating at the field!

The simulator is good for building muscle memory. Adjust it so there is more turbulence and always fly in at least 6mph wind, this will cause the plane to make odd twitches here and there, programming your brain to auto-correct.
 

Bricks

Well-known member
#6
Do you think the simulator helped? What differences are there between the similator and real flying?
I have Real Flight 7.5 as stated above depth perception is just not there very well. Most of it is building eye hand coordination and timing being able to react with out having to think which control to give, when things go arye. Learning to anticipate what the plane will do next before it actually does it..

Sayings have helped me rudder, canopy away or inverted push the tail in the direction you want to go with the stick. Inverted down is up and up is expensive.
 
#7
Do you think the simulator helped? What differences are there between the similator and real flying?
The sims helped me two ways. First, with every session, I was less likely to reverse control when a model is coming at me, and second, gave me a feel for flying with little sticks instead of real controls of an aircraft.

Staying oriented in a sim is all but imposable and something that comes natural one you start flying for real.
 
#8
I'm in the same boat as far as having to teach myself as every one I know that could buddy box is busy all the time. I think that's the main reason I have had 2 balsa glow planes for 15 years and never tried to fly them. I dont have a simulator besides picsim on my phone but even that has helped alot with muscle memory for when a plane is coming towards me. I to have had the 10 second flights and am currently getting to where I flew 2 batters through my explorer with many nice landings. But then I was flying it at dusk and couldnt see that well, lost orientation and turned straight into a row of trees. Plane wasnt that damaged,, until I used a pole to get it out and it broke into many pieces. Then I built a cub.. and tried switching to 4 channel. Hasn't gone that well.

Regardless keep up the good work and stay at it. Build, test, crash, repeat
 

d8veh

Well-known member
#9
Do you think the simulator helped? What differences are there between the simulator and real flying?
Just to make it clear, I've been flying with RC simulators for more than 15 years, and I was already an experienced flier when I started with one. I just wanted an answer from a beginner's point of view to see how much it helped or hindered a beginner because we have a couple of beginners on the forum who are just about to make the transition from simulator to real flying.
 

Bricks

Well-known member
#10
I use my Sim mostly for learning stick inputs for 3D flying, flying smoothly, keeping my lines straight down the runway, both of which I am bad at.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#11
Just to make it clear, I've been flying with RC simulators for more than 15 years, and I was already an experienced flier when I started with one. I just wanted an answer from a beginner's point of view to see how much it helped or hindered a beginner because we have a couple of beginners on the forum who are just about to make the transition from simulator to real flying.
Sims are great for some but they still lack a few things that only real world flying can provide.
Bird strikes are one, there is nothing like having the tail of your plane attacked by a bird especially if it manages to rip off or otherwise disable, half of your elevator.
Having your plane dissected by the propeller on another plane because the other pilot did not see your plane at all due to a form of tunnel vision.
Being required to perform extreme avoiding maneuvers to avoid a mid air and then finding that you have lost orientation.
Trying to fly and land a plane that has a sudden mechanical/electronic failure, possibly due to crash damage from a previous episode.
Trying to fly a plane that has been repaired, (often poorly), and has too much weight and less than nominal performance.
The list goes on!

One thing to really be concerned about is the SIM does not instill the need to use your peripheral vision to "See and track", other planes and obstacles whilst you are flying your model. It is common here, (at the local club), for those transitioning from Sim to real world to find every tree, and other obstacle with great regularity. We also had a somewhat famous beginner who could demonstrate fantastic control of his models and would fly in almost any weather. The only time he ever crashed was when he was required to share the sky with other users. He just could not adjust to the sudden appearance of other aircraft near his plane and in a panic of avoidance he would over react and lose control.

Whilst I applaud any path to RC flying TOO much reliance upon sims can stunt your real world development.

There are some who do not use sims when they start and they have something far better to conquer RC model aircraft flying. That is DETERMINATION! Heck some do not even have Expo, dual rates, or a buddy box and they still teach themselves to fly! (That was the way it was in days gone past)!

Have fun!
 

Headbang

Well-known member
#12
Just to make it clear, I've been flying with RC simulators for more than 15 years, and I was already an experienced flier when I started with one. I just wanted an answer from a beginner's point of view to see how much it helped or hindered a beginner because we have a couple of beginners on the forum who are just about to make the transition from simulator to real flying.
For me it was the ticket to Helicopters. I put 50hrs or more on the sim before attempting a real one, once I tried a real one I was able to hover and do basic flight right away. It is also invaluable for building muscle memory in 3D. But 2 years ago I got back into things after a 20yr break, I was awful in the sim, crash crash crash, 10-20sec flights. Kept at it, when I could take off, fly around, and land in the wind, I went to the LHS and grabbed a Timber. Rest is history. So for me the Sim is something I can not live without, and it made the hobby affordable.
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#13
I love the fact you are out there, doing it, and recognize that we are going to crash. I also love that you are doing just what I hope to do: Build. Fly. Crash. Repeat! I also add Enjoy!

In my sim experience, the Spear was hard to fly. If you liked the Bloody Baron, try simming the Dr1. If you are light on the sticks that thing can do just about anything.

I know the sim experience is not completely accurate, and since I haven't flown in RL yet, I can't compare and contrast. I still think it's a great way to get a general feel for how one particular model differs from another. I've already got tunnel vision. I learned that with my toy quads. I don't know how to handle heavy wind, bird attacks, the sun in my eyes, parts breaking, poorly built models, you name it. I didn't know it before and I don't know it now. Some things you just can't learn until they happen. Since I have nobody to buddy box me, I figure anything I gain in advance of going out to the field is a net gain.

Keep it up, man! It's the new pilots like you who inspire the new pilots like me. (y)
 

evranch

Well-known member
#14
Absolutely sim time was critical for me. None of my experience in flying real aircraft or simulated ones prepared me for the second-person experience of being fixed on the ground far from the airplane. Having to reverse controls just was not intuitive to me. I crashed countless simulated planes before daring to fly a real one. Years later I still find myself waggling the wings occasionally when I'm not sure if I'm coming or going.

For this purpose though, a fancy sim is not necessary. I put most of my time in on CRRCSim, free, basic graphics, runs on anything. I also logged a lot of hours flying PicaSim on mobile whenever I was bored, it's a great little RC simulator. Sim time can get you used to the piloting experience, but there's no substitute for actual flight time when it comes to control of the airplane.

One of the best things I think you can do to help with having to fly from outside your plane is to paint distinctive markings on the underside of the wings. I have a black plane with 3 white stripes on each wing, and it's never any issue to tell what orientation it is in.

I fly in Saskatchewan, and no sim can ever prepare you for the real experience here. Massive gusts and wind shifts always keep you on your toes, and continuous changes in flow over the hills create ever-shifting ridge lift and downdrafts. There are also angry birds and frozen thumbs. It's fun - if your plane is cheap or easy to fix!
 

jross

Well-known member
#16
So, I had a breakthrough over the long weekend.
Yay! Was a few days ago for me. Still buzzing. It's a great feeling when your trip to the flying field lasts more than 10 minutes.

Sim was critical to learn the skill of flying towards myself which is essential. It can really mess with your head. In terms of orientation, I find making the bottom of the plane far different from the top in pattern and contrast works well. I like dark stripes over white foam for the bottom. My eyes aren't what they once were and I find visual aids helpful. Thinking about adding different colour wingtip strobes for flat light flying. Anything to make it easier to see the plane and what it's doing.

Not sure if you're having the same issue but I need to learn to kill the motor BEFORE I crash. I find it tough as I'm thinking to myself, "You got this. You got this. Oops, you don't got this." Seems to happen so fast. When I crash while landing, I break less props. When I hit under power, I seem to break them every time. The Explorer is next for me. Hoping my first pusher will be easier on props.

I built a Spear. It's hanging on the wall looking cool. Every wing I've ever flown ended in tragedy. I don't have the chops yet. Found launching them a real bitch but thinking the Versa pusher might be more forgiving. Less fussy build time for sure.

Thanks for posting! Got me all jacked up again.
 

Headbang

Well-known member
#17
I have a hell of a time seeing planes. My go to is big black and white strips on the bottom. Yellow and black or blue trim on top. Led lighting or glow in the dark tape for dusk or night flying. Never ever for any reason, no matter how cool it looks, red and black.

Just keep at it and you will find you hit ground less and less, breaking less props. Down side is by not crashing you will have to move or build a bigger house to store all the planes!
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#18
Every wing I've ever flown ended in tragedy.
If you want to fly wing that is almost indestructible then do a search for a KFM wing. I have built and distributed dozens of them and all, (except one which had a modification fitted by cutting slots in the wing), are still flying and they all have either eaten the dirt of been eaten by a tree at one time or the other.

We use them for club organised full contact combat!

Just a thought!

have fun!
 

FlyingMonkey

Stuck in Sunny FL
Staff member
Admin
#19
Hey Me-Fab... If you're in Dothan, you're not even an hour drive from me. Let's plan to do some flying together!

Also, what are you doing January 3-6? There's a little gathering I'll be camping out at just outside of Iron City GA, looks like it's about 40 minutes south east of you. Message me if you'd be interested in checking it out.
 
#20
I have a hell of a time seeing planes. My go to is big black and white strips on the bottom. Yellow and black or blue trim on top. Led lighting or glow in the dark tape for dusk or night flying. Never ever for any reason, no matter how cool it looks, red and black.

Just keep at it and you will find you hit ground less and less, breaking less props. Down side is by not crashing you will have to move or build a bigger house to store all the planes!
Yup, I pushed a bit too far out and trashed Bloody Brit #1 due to not being able to see whether I was looking at the top or the bottom of the wing. #2 will have better color coding and yes, I can see why people are putting LEDs in their planes. Dusk is often a great time to fly!

I don't think I have anything to worry about as to being overrun with planes anytime soon as I'm the type that when I stop crashing just flying I'll bump it up a notch and in time...