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Vertigo

#1
I have been flying r/cs steadily (once a week) for about four years now. Though, I recently came into a position where I have the chance to fly all day everyday, so I am now flying at least twice a day, if not more. Most of this is in front of my house with an F-27Q (mini version), so it's not going too terribly high, but I am looking up at it at about an average of 45 degrees. About once a week I take my big Stryker out to the community center and fly it up around 1800-2000 feet, so I'm craning my head about 70-80 degrees for up to ten minutes at a time, if it's windy.

A few days after this routine started, I started to get dizzy at times, but I attributed it to a new medicine I had switched to. However, I consulted my doc, and she confirmed that it couldn't be causing it. Yesterday, after flying for maybe five minutes, I had to stumble my way back to the house, almost falling a few times, cause it all of a sudden turned into full blown vertigo. (The plane was wrecked.) I lay down on the couch, but the room kept spinning around me. After a few hours of this, and seeing my breakfast for the second time, I went to the doc, and he confirmed I had a pretty bad case of vertigo.

Clonapin is controlling it at the moment, but is it possible the sudden increase in flying caused it? I'd really rather not stop flying r/c planes.
 

SkySlayer

ARC=Almost Ready to Crash
#4
You must almost never fly when it is middle day and there are clouds because the clouds annoy your eyes and then they mislead your brain. The light from the sun entres the clouds, which magnifies it, and hit your eyes with too much light and then because the clouds are all pretty much the same height and colour it confuses you. If you have been flying when it's cloudy then this is most probably the case.
 
#8
At the community center I usually have it up high enough to where I literally cannot see it's orientation, it is just a tiny black dot against the sky. I just approximate it by judging it's movement through the air.

Luckily, the bottom is flat black and the top is bright red. I also have it a bit nose heavy, so if I get mixed up in the air I just let go of the sticks and it will come screaming back to earth. Of course, this makes it a bit harder to land, but I'd rather have some nose-dings than it go soaring for miles, never to be seen again.

I usually fly it high enough to take these pics, which give you some idea. The structures across the pond in the top pic are powerlines. And the shadows from the second pic are clouds. (I really need an fpv system...)



 
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#10
You must almost never fly when it is middle day and there are clouds because the clouds annoy your eyes and then they mislead your brain. The light from the sun entres the clouds, which magnifies it, and hit your eyes with too much light and then because the clouds are all pretty much the same height and colour it confuses you. If you have been flying when it's cloudy then this is most probably the case.
All the time I have been flying (20 odd yrs) I have never heard of that, and have never had it happen before. Interesting.
 
#13
I always fly with a pair of polarised sunnies, helps when those columbus clouds are sailing all over the sky - sorry skyslayer had to take the dig ;)