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Pumpkin drop event

Your Pre-field or pre-flight Checklist

FoamyDM

Building Fool-Flying Noob
#1
What is your Pre-Field/car loading Checklist, or your pre-flight checklist?

I imagine the pre-flight should look like like the list on the Maiden thread here. After my last failed maiden, I wish I had read it.
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
Mentor
#2
Mine is listed in that other thread so no need to retype it all here. I will say however that a post flight check is as important as a pre-flight. You have more time to go over it as you are not anxious and impatient to get in the air. Also you know what issues you had while flying and have it all fresh in your memory what to check. I also keep a log of what I do or changes I have made as well as updates to the results so if I run into problems on other things I have my own data base from experiences to pull from.
 

JimCR120

Got Lobstah?
Site Moderator
#3
I will say however that a post flight check is as important as a pre-flight. You have more time to go over it as you are not anxious and impatient to get in the air. Also you know what issues you had while flying and have it all fresh in your memory what to check.
Spoken like a Naval Aircrewman.:cool:
 

rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
#4
Working out a pre-flight checklist (and printing it out for reference in the flight box) is a great idea I think. Here's the steps that I follow when my excitement or nerves don't hijack my brain before putting a plane up in the air.

Once per flying session per model
  • radio functions check - before powering up model, flip every switch and wiggle every slider on the transmitter and listen to all the voice responses to make sure I remember how the radio is setup. Since I use a Taranis I make sure every switch and control has a voice queue during setup
  • control surface movement - does each flap move in the correct direction based on stick input?
  • range check - I hear these are important, but honestly I haven't done one yet. :eek:

    Once per flight
    • assembly check - if wing (or other parts) are removable, check to see if they are still solidly assembled
    • rubber band check - if any rubber bands are used on the plane, give them a stretch and look for cracking
    • structure flexing - give all the pieces a slight tug and push to make sure none of the surfaces wiggle or flex around inappropriately
    • control surfaces flex - pre-battery install, check control surfaces hinge tension and flex to make sure there is no hidden damage
    • battery voltage check - before plugging it in, make sure it's 4.2v per cell

    And as Psyborg points out, it's very very important to do a thorough checkout post rough landing/crash.

    I also keep a written log of every day's flying and comment on weather, each model, what battery size I was using, how the model handled, and very importantly a checklist of things I want to adjust, change, or repair back at the shop before I take that model out again. Then the night before I'm getting ready to go fly again, I double check the notes from the last time and make sure I checked off doing all the repairs and changes so I don't arrive at the field with a plane about to lose an elevator control horn for instance.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#5
The true pre-flight should start before you leave for the field. Mamy times I have arrived at the field and started to get setup only to find that I left the transmitter of batteries on the floor in the hanger:rolleyes:.

The worst error was to hurry to the field, (I woke up late), and left the wing of the model I wanted to maiden leaning up against the hanger floor.

My first steps on my pre-flight check list are TBA. (Transmitter, Batteries, Aircraft).
The next step is Caution or Careful. This refers to loading the car or trailer making sure that the planes are loaded carefully and so that they suffer no damage and cannot be thrown around if I am required to stop suddenly.

Last step in the initial part of the pre-flight is concentrate. Upon arrival at the field I do not let anything stop me from unpacking carefully and placing the aircraft down carefully. I do not stand there talking whilst holding my planes. I have seen a number of planes be dropped or even knocked from peoples hand in a crowded pit area especially when there is something unusual occurring like a runaway plane, fire or even "punch up". When my planes are unloaded and safe I then do the rounds and catch up on the gossip.

The remaining pre-flight steps are recorded in the aforementioned other thread.

Have fun!