• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

3 channel to 4 channel

#1
Hello all so I'm somewhat relatively new to the hobby, love building plans but have only successfully flown a mini trainer. I just got the new tutor and was wondering if anyone has made it so that you could flip a switch and go from a three channel to four channel flight mode. Kind of similar to the differential thrust configuration.
 

Attachments

quorneng

Master member
#2
Technically a plane set up to be a good 3 channel plane (Rudder, Elevator, Throttle) does not make a good 4 channel one with ailerons. It would also depend on how the Tx was configured for 3 channel as to whether the configuration could be used for 4 channel.
Some planes manage quite nicely using 3 channels but use ailerons without a rudder.
 
#3
Technically a plane set up to be a good 3 channel plane (Rudder, Elevator, Throttle) does not make a good 4 channel one with ailerons.
Why exactly?

I build out most of my planes as 4CH but I've still never gotten around to getting comfortable and automatic using the rudder. But it's there for me when I'm ready. Besides some wing geometries not lending themselves very well to ailerons, I can see absolutely no reason why the option for rudder or the option for ailerons can hurt you.
 

Flightspeed

Convicted Necroposter
#4
I think it would be possible, but I’m not sure why, it’s not that hard going from 3 to 4 ch, you’ll find it quite simple with a touch of practice, a simulator can really help too!
 

Bricks

Master member
#5
You can do this but the rudder will stay on the left stick if mode 2. Normal 3 channel is rudder and elevator on the right stick 4 channel rudder moves to the left stick.
 

Merv

Legendary member
#8
.... if anyone has made it so that you could flip a switch and go from a three channel to four channel flight mode....
Im sure it possible to do, but I don’t think it’s worth the effort.

A better solution may be to use high and low rates. Ailerons setup on low rates fly a lot like a 3 channel plane. On high rates, ailerons make the plane more responsive.
 
#9
Why exactly?

I build out most of my planes as 4CH but I've still never gotten around to getting comfortable and automatic using the rudder. But it's there for me when I'm ready. Besides some wing geometries not lending themselves very well to ailerons, I can see absolutely no reason why the option for rudder or the option for ailerons can hurt you.
Just curious that's all and I was thinking of it being a three channel with rudder and elevator with the option of switching ailerons in, but I think I'll experiment with rates as mentioned by Merv
 
#10
Just curious that's all and I was thinking of it being a three channel with rudder and elevator with the option of switching ailerons in, but I think I'll experiment with rates as mentioned by Merv
For sure, do it up. But I was responding to the post before mine telling you it wouldn't work very well. I'm hearing advice lately I'm not sure where it came from.
The important thing is to have a proven good flyer, which you've selected. It doesn't hurt a thing to have the full standard compliment of control surfaces - you don't have to use rudder or use ailerons if it feels like too much. As I said, I've never yet gotten super comfortable with rudder, but I usually have it there anyway. Rates, you'll adjust as you go. You might have them dialed down to be more gentle as you start, then amp them up a bit as you get real comfortable. No sweat.
 
#11
the most important part imo is muscle memory for roll stability switching main hand doing the stabilization is the most awkward part
if you can add mixes in your radio try flying the plane you're used to with yaw/roll(depending on the 3ch configuration) control on both sticks and try practicing controlling the plane using the hand you're not used to
that's a general advice nut can be specified more on the exact setup