Help! Am I going to regret my purchases of Night Timber X and Conscendo?

Flyingshark

Master member
The problem with pairing a receiver and transmitter from different companies is that to talk to each other they need to be speaking the same language/protocol. As @Ketchup said, for Spektrum, that protocol is DSM2 or DSMX, so any Spektrum receiver with enough channels will probably work.
 

Ketchup

4s mini mustang
To add to what @Flyingshark said, DSMX is the newer Spektrum protocol, and I usually prefer that. I have some experiences with DSM2 receivers losing signal in crowded airspace, but they are fine with only a few other people flying. Of course DSMX compatible transmitters will also work with DSM2 since it is backwards compatible, so you can use both. This is just something to watch out for if you ever decide to get receivers from other companies like orangeRX or lemonRX.
 

Douglas

Member
Alas, I made my purchase of a Simple Cub before I read Ketchup's message, but let's hope everything goes well. I purchased the the AR620 receiver. The plane should arrive by Friday. I'm sure I'll be asking for more advice in a few days.

I may still head for an airfield on Saturday with my Timber X in hope of finding an experienced pilot who can help me along.
 

Flyingshark

Master member
Alas, I made my purchase of a Simple Cub before I read Ketchup's message, but let's hope everything goes well. I purchased the the AR620 receiver. The plane should arrive by Friday. I'm sure I'll be asking for more advice in a few days.

I may still head for an airfield on Saturday with my Timber X in hope of finding an experienced pilot who can help me along.
The AR620 uses DSMX, and so does the DX8 G2, so it sounds like you shouldn't have any problems with the transmitter/receiver combo. Good luck on the build!
 

LitterBug

Troll Spammer
I think you should build a tiny trainer, fly it a bunch, and progress on to the other planes. It is a rough and tumble flyer that can take some abuse, and is a good "trainer". It has helped me progress immensely. The only thing that has helped more was all the time I spent flying sims like RealFlight9 to get a bunch of virtual crashing out of the way.

Cheers!
LitterBug
 

cranialrectosis

Faster than a speeding face plant!
Mentor
Seriously, @LitterBug has it right.

If you fly you crash.

You are going to crash and you are going to have to pick up the bits and put them in a big Hefty bag.

Embrace this. The sooner you do, the more fun this will all be.

My first Tiny Trainer lasted minutes. My second, lasted seconds. My third is still air worthy (I use that loosely) but I stole the electronics for a mini P-51.

This is the gift FliteTest gave the world, cheap, disposable planes that don't cost too much in time or money to crash. The further the bits fly, the harder we laugh.

Crashing an expensive plane you can't repair or crashing a detailed model it took 200 hours to build isn't fun.

You will fly harder, learn faster and have more fun on a cheap plane that you can crash without it getting expensive.

IMO you are less likely to regret your purchases if you learn to fly/crash/repair on the cheap first.

The radio and battery gear is the same and should last for hundreds of models. That's where to spend money as a beginner.

Create a build thread, assemble the model and take photos and notes and post them here on our forums. Film the maiden. This way you have the build documented and we can help you when you crash and can cheer with you when you fly. :)
 

Douglas

Member
Seriously, @LitterBug has it right.

My first Tiny Trainer lasted minutes. My second, lasted seconds. My third is still air worthy (I use that loosely) but I stole the electronics for a mini P-51.

But why? My first plane never crashed. It was a Champ Flyer that I flew maybe 8 or 9 times and then I just got bored with it. I gave it to someone else. My second plane, a Carbon Cub S+ flew fine for the first six flights, but then crashed because of an electronics error. Horizon Hobby replaced the plane for free. Why are your flitetest planes only flying for minutes or seconds?
 

cranialrectosis

Faster than a speeding face plant!
Mentor
Why are your flitetest planes only flying for minutes or seconds?

Because I was still learning how to build and fly (and do a pre-flight check). It is amazing just how quickly a plane ends when you have the elevators reversed in your transmitter... ;)

The lessons I learned in those first few planes/minutes will last a lifetime.

I have NEVER become bored with a plane I built myself BECAUSE I am not afraid to fly hard and crash it. :)

My third TT has probably 100 flights on it and maybe 30 crashes. I have broken the rubber bands off and caused the wing to fly off mid-flight by flying so hard and fast. I have ripped the tail completely off hitting a tree, taped it back on with popsickle splints and flown the remainder of the lipo.

I see people who never crash get bored and quit. You have to push past your comfort zone to learn. I find it easier to do so on a plane that only cost an hour and $2 to build.
 

Douglas

Member
Because I was still learning how to build and fly (and do a pre-flight check). It is amazing just how quickly a plane ends when you have the elevators reversed in your transmitter... ;)

The lessons I learned in those first few planes/minutes will last a lifetime.

I have NEVER become bored with a plane I built myself BECAUSE I am not afraid to fly hard and crash it. :)

My third TT has probably 100 flights on it and maybe 30 crashes. I have broken the rubber bands off and caused the wing to fly off mid-flight by flying so hard and fast. I have ripped the tail completely off hitting a tree, taped it back on with popsickle splints and flown the remainder of the lipo.

I see people who never crash get bored and quit. You have to push past your comfort zone to learn. I find it easier to do so on a plane that only cost an hour and $2 to build.
Good points (but build yourself a 3-channel plane running a 1S battery and I bet you'll get bored!)
 

LitterBug

Troll Spammer
Good points (but build yourself a 3-channel plane running a 1S battery and I bet you'll get bored!)
Well, you can always take a simple plane and put it in challenging conditions too.... Take the 3 channel Tiny Trainer that was given to me several years ago, and put it in solid wind with gusts for example.... (Still on my first tiny trainer)

Cheers!
LitterBug
 

JasonK

Participation Award Recipient
And when you start building your own air-frames... then you can start designing your own air-frames. I find that to be even more fun then just flying.
 

Douglas

Member
And when you start building your own air-frames... then you can start designing your own air-frames. I find that to be even more fun then just flying.
I'm sure you're right about that. My near zero-experience assumption though is that you can't build a foam board airframe that is going to perform as well as the Conscendo, or some other top performing planes. No?

Could a foam board plane land like this first plane? IDK.

 

JasonK

Participation Award Recipient
I'm sure you're right about that. My near zero-experience assumption though is that you can't build a foam board airframe that is going to perform as well as the Conscendo, or some other top performing planes. No?

Could a foam board plane land like this first plane? IDK.

yes ->

I had some one fly my v-tail (see signature) last Sunday and he was able to do most of the 3D stuff with it. He couldn't hover as the v-tail had to much coupling in yaw into roll (I believe that is what he explained), but he did all sorts of things with it... including stuff that would been close to that landing.
 

cranialrectosis

Faster than a speeding face plant!
Mentor
Good points (but build yourself a 3-channel plane running a 1S battery and I bet you'll get bored!)

Nope. I just find new and interesting things to do with it until I crash it to bits and re-use the electronics.

You asked if I think you would regret your choice of the planes. I say there is no reason to regret your choice of the planes so long as you learn the basics before you crash them, because EVERYONE crashes.

Lots of people come into this hobby with visions of flying only to have their hopes dashed the first time they crash. Too many people quit at that point. It sucks to see your $100 'easy to fly' plane turned to rubble in front of your girlfriend. I get it. Been there.

This hobby does not reward SAFE.

This hobby rewards balance and perseverance.

IMO you will enjoy your planes much more after you learn to fly and reach the point of fearlessness by building and crashing cheaper models first.



Note, fearless is not reckless. The AMA publishes rules to help tell the two apart.
 
Last edited:

SP0NZ

FT CAD Gremlin
Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Mentor
You know, I had the Simple Cub on order last night with the Power Pack C radial edition, but then I cancelled the order because Josh didn't mention the receiver in his build video. I didn't know what receiver to buy or where to put it on the plane. Perhaps that's a trivial thing, but it might not be...I have no idea.

Nonetheless, maybe I'll bite the bullet and purchase the Simple Cub. Can you tell me what receiver I need to buy and where I put it on the plane? I'll make the purchase right now if I can get all the parts.


The Simple Cub was designed for the Power Pack B Radial, not the Power Pack C Radial. Changing to the bigger C motor will affect your performance and experience with the plane.
 

varg

Build cheap, crash cheap
Timber X is definitely harder to fly than that carbon cub. It is a 3D capable plane with a flat low aspect ratio wing, very responsive, has adverse yaw, drags the tail through turns if you don't use the rudder. You can tone it down a lot through use of low rates but it has neutral stability. A handful in the wind without a gyro, it gets jostled around a lot. Gotta use the ailerons on the ground too or it gets flipped over very easily.

I love my Timber X. Hovering, flat spins, poptops, crankshafts, crazy snap rolls. It's a very capable plane.
 

Douglas

Member
My Flitetest Cub was delayed and so I went ahead and flew the Conscendo. I don't know what the hubbub was all about; this is a very easy airplane to fly. I thought it was much easier to fly than my Carbon Cub S+. Not that the Carbon Cub is hard to fly (although the GPS can cause trouble), but it doesn't float like a glider. Not having a prop spinning most of the time is one less thing to deal with.

The only thing that might cause real trouble is if a beginner found himself flying the Conscendo Evolution in a place with a small area in which to land. The plane does not want to land, it wants to glide.