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Do you keep a flight log?

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#21
There are similar requirements and exemptions here in AUS. As for the log keeping, I used to but after the second volume I stopped keeping a log and even stopped keeping build/repair logs as well as it was really eating into my time both on the field and on the bench.

For a beginner hobbyist a log is great as you can see trends or areas of specific problems upon which you can apply greater effort in developing your flight skills. Just a note though keep the log concise and brief or the voluminous nature of the log will tend to rend it useless and rather congested with irrelevant material. Harder to search through an encyclopedia than a single chapter.

have fun!
 

L Edge

Well-known member
#22
When you fly the large cc planes, your dealing with large amounts of cash. So, I keep a log of my 10 min gasoline flights and the log of the voltages for ignition and rx usages before and after. That way, you can detect if there are any irregularities and quit flying. Pilot error and battery failure are usually 2 of the main causes of destruction. This way it helps eliminates one of the ways. I tend to get 9 -10min flights so the chances of error go up and here is a way to keep it down.
 

SquirrelTail

Well-known member
#23
When you fly the large cc planes, your dealing with large amounts of cash. So, I keep a log of my 10 min gasoline flights and the log of the voltages for ignition and rx usages before and after. That way, you can detect if there are any irregularities and quit flying. Pilot error and battery failure are usually 2 of the main causes of destruction. This way it helps eliminates one of the ways. I tend to get 9 -10min flights so the chances of error go up and here is a way to keep it down.
What I do on mine is check the receiver switches, ignition, check all the controls twice then make sure it is good to go.
 

PoorManRC

Well-known member
#24
IF I can ever get a large scale Plane.....
I'm SKIPPING Nitro, an going straight to Gas!!! ๐Ÿ˜Š

I raced RC Buggies through the 90's, and vowed NEVER AGAIN Nitro! ๐Ÿ˜– What a PITA! ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜ 

Running 2 strokes is definitely a good cause to use a Log. Tuning, inspection and Service should be on a fairly strict schedule. Those Aircraft Engines ain't CHEAP.
 

PoorManRC

Well-known member
#27
Same here! Unless someone just has an old nitro they are wanting to get rid of or something.
..... I'd STILL even convert THAT to Gas!! I'd only consider 1.20 and UP sized only.
I remember the CONSTANT Tuning and Tweaking back in my 1/8th Scale Nitro Buggy Racing days...
NO THANKS!! ๐Ÿ˜–๐Ÿ˜ก๐Ÿ˜ 
 
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Fidget

Active member
#28
I started this after Flite Fest this year. I use an A6 notebook. (It's a little skinnier than an 8.5x11" page folded in half. They also fit in a suit pocket for taking notes at meetings.) For a couple of planes I've printed out the page, but I can also just scribble on a new page. What convinced me was dragging a plane to the flight line and then realizing I'd meant to change a servo out. And then flying another plane and forgetting I'd meant to change the subtrims. And then.... I finally broke down and did something.
I also lose track of where the motors I bought went. Having to store planes in my crawl space, that's a pain.

I've attached a pdf of the Word document I use. I also have a page at the beginning of the booklet with my FAA, FCC (technician license for FPV), AMA numbers and my name and phone number in case someone finds the book.
 

Attachments

L Edge

Well-known member
#29
Since I fly a lot of experimental planes, there is no place to compare data. So I keep a log of all pertinent info for that model.

Things like control deflections, expo, flight modes and the programming mixing as well as setting up of the radio for port assignments and channel input config.

That way, I can always refer to the notebook when I need to refresh how to mix or how much deflection I should put in etc. Looking back on mixes make things on a new airplane simple if it is written down in the past.

The newest I did is sequencing a brake on a transport that allows it to taxi slowly. That was a bear of a problem and if it wasn't written down, I would be at a lost and spend lots of time to digest it once more. Logs rule!!!
 

bracesport

Well-known member
#30
I just starting making a flight log thread - it was a catchup collating all my flights (not that many) but going forward I am also going to add some data!