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Esc-battery connection

#1
Hi,
I made my first ever scratch build, based on the FT simple cub plans. The plane weighs around 350g (without electronics) and has a wingspan of 102cm. I got recommended some props, motor, esc and battery. But i’m not sure if the esc and battery will connect right. It’s a protek battery with JST type connector and the esc has a XT-60 type connector. Can somebody help me out?
Thank you
Felix
 
#2
The battery and ESC have to have the same type of connector. You could either cut the JST connector off the battery and solder a XT-60 connector on, or leave the JST connector one the battery and cut the XT-60 off the ESC. I would recommend doing it the second way because if the two end off the battery wire touch it will short out and might catch on fire.

If you don't know how to solder Youtube has some great videos.

Hope this helps.

-Jeremy
 
#5
The battery and ESC have to have the same type of connector. You could either cut the JST connector off the battery and solder a XT-60 connector on, or leave the JST connector one the battery and cut the XT-60 off the ESC. I would recommend doing it the second way because if the two end off the battery wire touch it will short out and might catch on fire.

If you don't know how to solder Youtube has some great videos.

Hope this helps.

-Jeremy
Ha! Sorry, I didn't mean to copy your post, but yours showed up right as I clicked "post reply".
 
#6
Hi,
I made my first ever scratch build, based on the FT simple cub plans. The plane weighs around 350g (without electronics) and has a wingspan of 102cm. I got recommended some props, motor, esc and battery. But i’m not sure if the esc and battery will connect right. It’s a protek battery with JST type connector and the esc has a XT-60 type connector. Can somebody help me out?
Thank you
Felix
Hello and welcome to the forum!

What you will need to do is solder an XT-60 connector to the battery, or a JST connector onto the ESC. However, you could also buy an adapter like this one.

Here is a link to a video about soldering battery connectors.

Hope this helps!
Thank you all for your fast answers!
I just want to point out that I didn’t buy anything yet. And since I don’t know anything about all this stuff I would like not to start soldering things together. So can I just buy the same battery with the XT-60 plug?
 
#7
Thank you all for your fast answers!
I just want to point out that I didn’t buy anything yet. And since I don’t know anything about all this stuff I would like not to start soldering things together. So can I just buy the same battery with the XT-60 plug?
Yes, most people prefer XT-60s to JSTs anyway.
 

mrjdstewart

Well-known member
#8
JST's are meant for smaller craft and can only handle so many C's being drawn from the battery. if flying something like the cub that is larger and will be pulling power, best to use a xt-60.

good luck,

me :cool:
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#9
Thank you all for your fast answers!
I just want to point out that I didn’t buy anything yet. And since I don’t know anything about all this stuff I would like not to start soldering things together. So can I just buy the same battery with the XT-60 plug?
Maybe yes, maybe no...I say that because some smaller weight batteries don't come with XT-60 connectors, they come with XT-30 connectors (which are similar, just smaller versions).

Since you said you scratch built a Simple Cub, that one should be running a 3S 1300mAh battery. While it's a little on the small side for most FT planes (most run a 2200mAh, which is bigger and heavier), you should have no problems whatsoever finding one that has XT60 connectors.

In fact:

Tattu 1300 mAh 11.1v/3S battery with XT60 connector

There's a perfect example, via Amazon. Just make sure you get a 3S; there are 4S batteries in the same mAh but they might be too much voltage for your motor or ESC on the Simple Cub. I've used Tattus for a couple years now and only issues with them have been puffiness due to some crashes I had on my quad. That way, you don't have to worry about wires touching each other, getting a good solder connection, etc.
 
#11
Hi,
I made my first ever scratch build, based on the FT simple cub plans. The plane weighs around 350g (without electronics) and has a wingspan of 102cm. I got recommended some props, motor, esc and battery. But i’m not sure if the esc and battery will connect right. It’s a protek battery with JST type connector and the esc has a XT-60 type connector. Can somebody help me out?
Thank you
Felix
You have to change the connector yourself and solder on the correct one.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#13
I agree with @mrjdstewart, you first need to do the calculation to see if your battery can supply the amp draw. If you draw too many amps you will damage the battery. The formula is mAh/1000 x C = amp draw. Example, if your battery is 25C, 800 mAh, you can safely draw 20 amps (800/1000x25 = 20). You need to consider how may amps the motor will draw plus allow a bit of overhead for the servos.

In this example, If your setup draws more than 20 amps you will damage your pack.
 
#14
I just did the same thing you want to do I changed out my jst's connectors with xt30's.
Just make sure when you cut the wires you cut one at a time or you will wipe out a pair of snips I did that with a Ni-cad years ago when I was in RC trucks I don't what I was thinking I just snipped both wires together and burnt the Jaws off pair of wire cutters
 
#17
No, you can safely use a 20a ESC with that battery. The battery calculation gives you an amp rating that battery can safely supply. It's perfectly fine to use less amps, just don't pull more amps from the battery.
And how can I choose how many amps I pull out of the battery?
 

Merv

Well-known member
#18
It’t the motor that pulls most of the amps from the battery. The servos also pull a few amps, about .7 amps each for a 9g servos. Most places that sell motors will have the specs on amp draw. A cheap watt meter is a useful tool to measure amp draw from your motor.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#20
The website said this motor draws a max of 18 Amps, a 20 amp ECS would be the minimum to use. I would be more comfortable with a 25 amp ESC, it's good to have a bit of overhead. Your 35 amp ESC will work just fine.

The ESC rating, like the battery rating, it's a number not to exceed. It's perfectly fine to use less than the maximum permitted.