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How hot is too hot to fly?

#1
Hey all, finally built my first foamie, but out in castaic CA it's regularly 90-100+ in the summer, so I'm worried about the integrity of my hot glue joints if I try to fly in this kind of weather. I guess my question is what would be the upper limit for hot weather, and would cutting vents/scoops in my power pods and over the battery increase that limit? Please help!
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#3
Well, 100 degrees is pushing it with the glue joins; the glue can get soft and let go.

That said, it's Southern California - I know it's not that hot all the time. Lake Castaic is a nice area; while it can reach 100 degrees (and it is hitting that this week and for the foreseeable near future), it's not always up in that range.

Since I get some of those temps out at my field in inland San Diego area (Fallbrook), what I have learned is 1) don't leave a plane in the car when the temp is 100 degrees outside. 2) Leave your plane in the shade, if you can; direct sunlight over a prolonged period in 100 degree heat will definitely melt those joins.
 

The Hangar

Well-known member
#4
I have flown in fairly hot weather, and the foam board/glue was fine, but my electronics heated up. If you put the esc and receiver in an area that has lots of airflow and let the plane cool down after each flight, or when the electronics are too hot to touch. I don’t know exact safe/unsafe temps for electronics are, so hopefully someone else can help you with that. If you can’t touch it, then it’s too hot. As far as the foam board and glue goes, I think flying in 100 degree weather should be fine - especially if you let the plane cool a bit between flights. There are other foam-safe flies you could probably use as well. Good luck!
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#10
I have flown several times this summer with temps well into the nineties and everything was fine. However, if you are really worried about it you can use wood glue, I have heard that titebond is really good.
You definitely can use wood glue - only...Issue? Frustration? Complication? with using wood glue is it takes a lot longer to dry than hot glue, so if you're gluing a wing and trying to get it weighed down, you'll want a couple of reasonably heavy books to put on the contact points and hold it down.
 

Hoomi

Well-known member
#13
It was over 90 on Sunday morning when I put the Simple Scout up for a flight. I think what effect the heat may have on our planes will depend on whether we used high or low temp hot glue.
 

PoorManRC

Well-known member
#14
@muddywilson That Cruiser looks great! 👍👍
Try to remember, Air doesn't scale down well...
Meaning, your Power Pod Scoops should be a little bigger. But great idea!

I'm currently Grounded. I'm in Arizona, and we're in the 105-115 range! 🔥🔥
I've got the time and patience to build with Wood Glue. Might try it.
 

Hoomi

Well-known member
#17
@muddywilson That Cruiser looks great! 👍👍
Try to remember, Air doesn't scale down well...
Meaning, your Power Pod Scoops should be a little bigger. But great idea!

I'm currently Grounded. I'm in Arizona, and we're in the 105-115 range! 🔥🔥
I've got the time and patience to build with Wood Glue. Might try it.
I don't think we've hit 115 yet in the Old Pueblo. Sunday morning at the SAGE field in Marana, we were pushing 95 by 9:00 a.m., but I think our high on Sunday was 106. The way the weather has been behaving lately, we need to fly early to beat the heat, but also to beat the winds, which start picking up around mid-morning. We had a number of club members out flying early, and one was still flying when I left at 9:00 (though he wasn't flying any FT foamboard planes).
 

PoorManRC

Well-known member
#18
I don't think we've hit 115 yet in the Old Pueblo. Sunday morning at the SAGE field in Marana, we were pushing 95 by 9:00 a.m., but I think our high on Sunday was 106. The way the weather has been behaving lately, we need to fly early to beat the heat, but also to beat the winds, which start picking up around mid-morning. We had a number of club members out flying early, and one was still flying when I left at 9:00 (though he wasn't flying any FT foamboard planes).
Give it time... I'm also in the Old Pueblo, far East side. This week isn't good for any of us, Monsoons can't make up their mind, but the Humidity is in full force! It may be keeping the temps down, but it's surely not good for paper and Foam Core Board Aircraft!! 😳
I keep hearing that we're going to have a horribly HOT August! I really hope they're wrong.
 

Headbang

Well-known member
#19
The planes I have built using white gorilla glue have been great, they seem to warp less, not get as spongy over time, over all feel better in the air over time. And of course the heat is not an issue. I use heavy chunks of square steel to hold things as it dries, for the wings I use a super straight length of 2x6 and wiegh it down evenly.
 

PoorManRC

Well-known member
#20
The planes I have built using white gorilla glue have been great, they seem to warp less, not get as spongy over time, over all feel better in the air over time. And of course the heat is not an issue. I use heavy chunks of square steel to hold things as it dries, for the wings I use a super straight length of 2x6 and wiegh it down evenly.
Same here... I use a 2x6 4ft piece of MDF, which is quite heavy, and very straight. My current build is a combination of both Hot Glue and White Gorilla Glue.