• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

How to Help a DJI Pilot

Techno

Sunny Day Park Flyer
#1
Hey All, I have a conundrum that I honestly need a second (or more) opinion on.
I'm in high school right now, and I've befriended a guy in my woodshop class. He asked me what prior experience I had with building and working with tools. I told him I was an RC pilot and was building a second tricopter and a trainer (forum threads to come). Anyway, he said "oh cool, I've got a quadcopter." I lit up, "finally, someone to help me pick up the pieces of my planes!" But really, I asked him what kind of Quad it was. I first described a DJI phantom to him and asked if got one. He said, "Oh no, not a Phantom, but It's from DJI." I was surprised, maybe he got the octocopter for $5000. He continued of how it cost $3000 and had moving arms. I was astonished. I had finally found another pilot, and he got the DJI Inspire 1. As the conversation continued I found out he had no other planes, simulators, AMA membership, nothing. Obviously I had to do something.
What I have found out:
He knows what he's talking about.
The Inspire 1 has not arrived yet, probably in the mail.
He has (about 4 minutes of) experience flying quadcopters (probably a Phantom.)
He has no AMA Membership
I'm going to have to be his guide into RC.

My question for YOU is, What should I do?
I know from Red20's "Drone Dad" articles that I can't destroy it, or stop him (I want to fly it too).
Have any of you dealt with a similar situation and how?
Should I tell him to start small, like I did?
What do I do?
 

makattack

Winter is coming
Moderator
Mentor
#2
Yikes. That's an expensive first multirotor to try out... Good on you for wanting to help guide him in his journey. It's great that you want to help him and make sure he see success, but are you sure he wants your help? I find one of the best ways to help educate others is to set a good example.

Maybe since he's waiting on his DJI Inspire to arrive, just invite him over to your field, introduce him to members, show how you setup your tricopter for flight with full pre-flight checks, then show him how to safely take off and fly.

If you really are motivated, you can even buddy box him, if you have or can borrow an extra transmitter that's compatible with yours.

Other than that, I find lecturing isn't as effective as demonstrating.

I had a forehead slap moment a few months ago when I saw someone setting up to fly a Phantom, and out of curiosity went up to him to say hello. He was already talking about it to a few other random people who stopped to observe and while demonstrating it, he turned off his transmitter to have it trigger RTH and self-land. I was horrified that he was willing to relinquish all control of it and depend solely on his sensors operating correctly. I actually said "you don't have to relinquish control to show us" and his reply just left me shaking my head: "it's fine, this thing is very reliable" -- granted, there's a case for autonomous flight, but one should always have some control/immediate manual override over the autonomous vehicle in my opinion.
 
Last edited:

Techno

Sunny Day Park Flyer
#3
Yikes. That's an expensive first multirotor to try out... Good on you for wanting to help guide him in his journey. It's great that you want to help him and make sure he see success, but are you sure he wants your help? I find one of the best ways to help educate others is to set a good example.

Maybe since he's waiting on his DJI Inspire to arrive, just invite him over to your field, introduce him to members, show how you setup your tricopter for flight with full pre-flight checks, then show him how to safely take off and fly.

If you really are motivated, you can even buddy box him, if you have or can borrow an extra transmitter that's compatible with yours.

Other than that, I find lecturing isn't as effective as demonstrating.

I had a forehead slap moment a few months ago when I saw someone setting up to fly a Phantom, and out of curiosity went up to him to say hello. He was already talking about it to a few other random people who stopped to observe and while demonstrating it, he turned off his transmitter to have it trigger RTH and self-land. I was horrified that he was willing to relinquish all control of it and depend solely on his sensors operating correctly. I actually said "you don't have to relinquish control to show us" and his reply just left me shaking my head: "it's fine, this thing is very reliable" -- granted, there's a case for autonomous flight, but one should always have some control/immediate manual override over the autonomous vehicle in my opinion.
No kidding about the cost, that's more than my entire fleet. I like the idea of bringing him to a club, but there aren't any near me. I'm in a suburb of NYC, I fly out of parks. Also, to be honest, the reason why this is my second tricopter is because I couldn't get the first one to work. 1200KV motors + a huge frame (1000KV recommended)= crash. (don't worry, I did my homework, I'm using the Tricopter V3 now)I do however, have some micro quads (hubsan, Proto X). I think I'll let him train on those for a while. they're indestructible
 

makattack

Winter is coming
Moderator
Mentor
#4
Yeah, sorry, big assumption on my part about you being near an RC club. At any rate, you can start a club at your school! Anyway, since AMA membership is free for youths under 19, there's no reason why that's not a great start. You can start by saying that AMA membership is free and opens up more information and insurance for him!
 
#5
I would not buddy box... dunno if you can on the DJI remote??? If I were you guide him and help him with the first flight and setup, explain batteries and GPS calibration... honestly guide him and try to make sure that his initial flight is in the middle of no where...