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How to Make Plans?

#3
I use inkscape, are you asking more about designing each part of the plane so you can build it, or making them look like all of ft's plans?
I want to make plans so I can make building more precise for me and so I can give them to the people that want to build the things I create. But I want to know which way is easiest to do it.
 

Boberticus

Active member
#4
Nerdnic's videos are a good learning point, heres the first video in a three parter where he designs a plane in front of you but he uses a program that isnt free...

Inkscape is the way to go for free software, it can do all of the things Nic does with Adobe, you just gotta learn a bit on how it works and modify what Nic is doing to Inkscape. You will be able to whip out models quicker than drawing by hand, you just gotta get the basics down first.

For example the Bezier tool is basically what he uses throughout his drawing/sketching, and under the "path" and "object" tabs there are some good merge and cut path options that do pretty much whatever you could need for drawing up and fitting together shapes. under extensions you can measure curved and straight lines, ect.

Its super powerful software, something you could use professionally if you were so inclined, and outputs SVG files, which are useful for Fusion 360, and is a very good starting point to learn concepts like components, groups and layers, ect. before moving onto 3D CAD programs like Fusion(Also free).
 

Grifflyer

WWII fanatic
#5
Nerdnic's videos are a good learning point, heres the first video in a three parter where he designs a plane in front of you but he uses a program that isnt free...

Inkscape is the way to go for free software, it can do all of the things Nic does with Adobe, you just gotta learn a bit on how it works and modify what Nic is doing to Inkscape. You will be able to whip out models quicker than drawing by hand, you just gotta get the basics down first.

For example the Bezier tool is basically what he uses throughout his drawing/sketching, and under the "path" and "object" tabs there are some good merge and cut path options that do pretty much whatever you could need for drawing up and fitting together shapes. under extensions you can measure curved and straight lines, ect.

Its super powerful software, something you could use professionally if you were so inclined, and outputs SVG files, which are useful for Fusion 360, and is a very good starting point to learn concepts like components, groups and layers, ect. before moving onto 3D CAD programs like Fusion(Also free).
Ya beat me to it, you worded it much better than I would have :D
 
#6
Nerdnic's videos are a good learning point, heres the first video in a three parter where he designs a plane in front of you but he uses a program that isnt free...

Inkscape is the way to go for free software, it can do all of the things Nic does with Adobe, you just gotta learn a bit on how it works and modify what Nic is doing to Inkscape. You will be able to whip out models quicker than drawing by hand, you just gotta get the basics down first.

For example the Bezier tool is basically what he uses throughout his drawing/sketching, and under the "path" and "object" tabs there are some good merge and cut path options that do pretty much whatever you could need for drawing up and fitting together shapes. under extensions you can measure curved and straight lines, ect.

Its super powerful software, something you could use professionally if you were so inclined, and outputs SVG files, which are useful for Fusion 360, and is a very good starting point to learn concepts like components, groups and layers, ect. before moving onto 3D CAD programs like Fusion(Also free).
Alright, cool I’ll check out them out. Thanks!
 
#11
If you happen to have a student in the house, they can get a student license of AutoCAD (and Fusion 360).

My son and I, recently decided to get into RC flight. As he is a student, he can get an account with AutoDesk.

This may not help the OP, but AutoCAD is simple to import a PDF and start drafting.

If a PDF of an png or jpg image, you'll have to use the tools to trace out the 3-view.

If it is a vector image, like the FT designs, you can just delete all the extraneous stuff and start to manipulate the curves you imported.

My son wants to experiment with wings, so we are modifying the FT Tiny Trainer wings to enhance our ability to crash things more excitingly.

My project for next year is a 1/6th DTFB model of a B-24, and after we got happy with about a week of playing with AutoCAD, we drafted a plan in few hours we can prototype a tiny model out of cardstock.

Cheers!
 
#13

Flitedesign 3d

Well-known member
#14
True, I think you can do pretty much the same things in Fusion 360...and more.

In fumbling around, I just got AutoCAD to do what I wanted quicker...with a bit of patience, Fusion 360 could be grokked, and it might actually be better.
It depends on what you are making. For 3d modeling fusion is way better in my opinion, I use autocad only to make the final plans based on the 3d model made in fusion
 

SP0NZ

FT CAD Gremlin
Staff member
Moderator
Mentor
#15
If you happen to have a student in the house, they can get a student license of AutoCAD (and Fusion 360).

My son and I, recently decided to get into RC flight. As he is a student, he can get an account with AutoDesk.
Just be aware that the 2019 and newer versions of AutoCAD for students will watermark all the files with a plot stamp indicating it was created with a student version. This includes any PDF files that you export from AutoCAD as well.
 
#16
Just be aware that the 2019 and newer versions of AutoCAD for students will watermark all the files with a plot stamp indicating it was created with a student version. This includes any PDF files that you export from AutoCAD as well.
Yes, I forgot to mention that. I also have Adobe Pro, so I just yeet the stamps after export.

PS. Your plans are very nicely drafted.

UPDATE: Based on Flitedesign3D, I may migrate quickly to Fusion 360. I found a course on Udemy for Fusion 360 from a hobbyist who didn't like the other courses and wanted a course that teaches you what you need to know as you need to know it, rather than show all the bells and whistles, thus creating the course he would have liked to take.

Fusion 360 for Hobbyists and Woodworkers.

I don't know if Udemy discounts lots of things, but I've taken a number of good courses and I got this one at a good discount.

I'll post back how it was if I think it was any good.

UPDATE 2: There is a sale on at Udemy until tomorrow, 28 Feb 2020. That's how I got the course for $12.99. I'm willing to lose $12.99 for this course, as the guy who did it has a good story for why he made the course.
 
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#18
I finished the Fusion 360 course. It goes into more detail than is needed for making foam board plans, but the the way the instructor taught the Fusion 360 environment was good. He described ONLY the functions you needed for the demo project you were doing and each demo project built on the last. By the 4th demo project I was comfortable with the Fusion 360 environment (but I am an engineer and have been drafting in some form or another for about 40 years.

For $12, I would recommend this Udemy course for someone who is interested in 3D modeling and CnC routing (info is in my post above).

There is an alternative to that I'll talk about below.

Once I got the feel of things and tried to practice on the FT Flyer - there were gaps in my knowledge, that I could figure out how to fill.

1. How to import and use PDFs in Fusion 360 - turn them into image files and import as "skins" -
2. How best to start a sketch and use constraints properly - don't bother to draw a perfect shape, but draw an approximate shape and use the dimensioning tools and constraints to define your object precisely -
3. How to fold stuff in Fusion 360 - sheet metal tools -
4. How to make foam board plane in Fusion 360 - what I wanted to be able to do, but didn't understand how to use Fusion 360 at all...-
- UPDATE - This video is somewhat helpful, but the guy doesn't build planes in the FT fashion.

Videos 1 and 2 are from a Danish chap named Lars Christensen and actually he has some Fusion 360 training videos - https://www.youtube.com/user/cadcamstuff

Fusion 360 for Absolute Beginners Part 1 -

I haven't watched the series, but his videos also might be a good enough to get you to the point where you have enough knowledge to do the stuff you want to do for building foam board aircraft plans and more.

Happy building to you all.

Cheers!

UPDATE: If you don't have Illustrator to convert drawings into to vector drawings (SVG format), you can use the app Inkscape for free: https://inkscape.org/
 
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Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#19
Does anyone know an easy and cheap way to make plans?
Well for price the cheapest plan making method I use is using a pencil, graph paper, (A1 or A0), and a ruler. I build in almost any material available and do a number of experimental designs as well as conversions from one material to an different material, (for example from an old balsa design to FB).

The paper design allows me to build, alter the plans and rebuild to the altered spec without having to print out the plans each time I make an alteration or modification. When the design is set and performs as expected I can then transfer the plans to CAD. I have somewhere between 50 and 100 paper designs and only have published a maximum of a handful.

The paper first method I use actually gives me a series of exact co-ordinates that make the transfer of the dimensions or co-ordinates into CAM units extremely easy and accurate. I have even redrawn FT designs to get exact co-ordinates for my builds. I hate the questions around the line thicknesses and the like.

Just what works for me!

Have fun!
 
#20
Hi
I am trying to find a 3D Package to create the 2d cut out shapes that can then be curved to make fuselage panels.
I have found some already made ones with cut out formers included but they aren’t very accurate when scaled up
https://ftforumx2.s3.amazonaws.com/2019/09/251948_ca68849575ab5a0ffb6b20f7ddba2836.pdf


http://from-paper.com/en/news/aviation/2581-models-by-marek-supermarine-spitfire-mk-viii-british-fig...

Using 3D drawings
https://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints/ww2planes/ww2-supermarine/79153/view/supermarine_spitfire_...

https://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints/ww2planes/ww2-yakovlev/46750/view/yakovlev_yak-3/

is it possible using fusion 360 to make the 2d shapes that can then be bent to make the fuselage pieces?
The posts above seem to suggest so but never used fusion 360 so would be interested in people's thoughts on this
Thanks