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Materials to use for skinning.

Fallegon

Active member
#1
So as I near completion of my first design I have to do tests with different skin materials. Here are the specs of different materials I plan to use along with the information on them if any others want to try my build. Ideas and improvements are welcome.
20180929_204831.jpg

No idea what this stuff is. I got it by accident at micheals thinking it was cardstock. But its like plasticy on one side and a bit less flexible than cardstock.
20180929_204849.jpg

This is cardstock. Flimsy and prone to creasing, but its the lightest.
20180929_204902.jpg

This is a .02mm polystyrene sheet. much heavier than cardstock but much more durable and better looking.
20180929_204923.jpg

Here is the overall weight of the bf109f2 stencils in cardstock.

With some math involved the styrene is about 2.75 times heavier which would put the bf109 stencils around 76g. I dont doubt that the C pack can handle the weight so I guess itl be makers preference as to the materials.
 

HilldaFlyer

Well-known member
#2
I would need to know more about what you mean "skin materials". Are you re-skinning the entire plane or just asking about the materials for the turtle deck? From the materials you are showing I would assume you're talking about the turtle deck that is typically card stock.
 

Fallegon

Active member
#3
Nope its the entire plane. check my post about the bf 109. Which I ended up doing in card stock. The polystene really difficult to bend around the curves. If I had a heat gun and more time I might try it again.
 

HilldaFlyer

Well-known member
#4
Ok, I just read the BF 109 thread and I now understand what you are trying to do.

Very similar in design to my biplane, foam formers with a skin.


This plane was built up with foam formers and fiberglass.

Here is a shot of the tail.


And the wing.
The basic technique is to overlay the formers with tissue paper, and then with fiberglass and epoxy resin. Of course I don't expect you to do something like this... but it can be done.

It looks like you are going for more smooth finish. For other materials to span formers smoothly I'd use a rather thick paper. In my hands card stock is a bit too thick to roll,curve nicely, but craft paper is pretty good. Oh, I should mention that if you are going to use card stock, moisten it with a mist of water and it rolls nicely. I've done that will all my card stock turtle decks.

Back to the craft paper, lay down some glue on the formers and overlay them with the craft paper. Treat it like paper mache. Paper has a grain to it and does not bend over compound curves. You have the general idea with the card stock, it is just really hard to get right and it is very unforgiving on curves. I have used the paper mache technique by using water based polyurethane (Americana DuraClear - AC Moore) and craft paper. You might like it.
 

Fallegon

Active member
#6
@HilldaFlyer yeah I do like that idea though I feel like wetting the cardstock could lead to warpage and poor adhesion to hot glue. However a layer of resin could be applied to the cardstock to finalize it. Could be a way of removing imperfection such as over lap lines or crease lines. Would be worth a try.

@Bricks I was already thinking about using a vacuum former for the canopy. I have a 3d printer though so I can easily print out my parts. I was looking for something a little more approachable for other who dont have access to these technologies. Before I have used bent music wire and jb weld and suprizingly it held up well. I do think however that simply cutting out a foamboard canopy is a very approachable solution to these models and for those who want to go above and beyond are welcome to.
 

HilldaFlyer

Well-known member
#7
@HilldaFlyer yeah I do like that idea though I feel like wetting the cardstock could lead to warpage and poor adhesion to hot glue. However a layer of resin could be applied to the cardstock to finalize it. Could be a way of removing imperfection such as over lap lines or crease lines. Would be worth a try.

Yeah, I thought the water would make a mess of things but you only mist it enough to make it flimsy. The hot glue holds just fine and the best part is when it dries, it shrinks to a nice tight fit.