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New to RC Bult FT Flyer

#1
Hey I'm new to RC and I just Built the FT Flyer but a friend gave me a 30 A ESC a 1000KV Brush-less motor and a 10x4.5 Propeller. Will this work at all?

PS
Using Flysky Transmitter and Receiver the i6 one.
 

kdobson83

Active member
#2
It should work yes, but it'll be a tad heavy making you fly at a higher speed to stay aloft. I'd have to say you'll have unlimited vertical tho. Lol That setup would work on the FT Scout too, which I heard was an awesome trainer.
 

donalson

Active member
#5
the motorsize also is important...

I picked up a few 2212 1000kv motors and 30a esc, both are rated for 2-4s, I've got a few 2700mah 2s batteries I plan to start with and a few 1400ish mah 3s batteries (about the same weight as the 2s) for faster flying...

i'm starting with the 3 pack (already spent a good bit of time on sims)... and then debating on where to go next... part of me wants to do an FPV wing or play with the bloody wonder... but I also want to play with full 4 channel... so the simple scout, or simple cub are high on the list... the cub has a high wing that is removable (and rubber band mounted) so logic tells me its prob slightly more durable to crashes... and easier to transport...

whatever I build next will be able to use the swappable pod/kit... and will be something scratch built...
 

DamoRC

Well-known member
Mentor
#6
Thanks and is a 2200 MAh Battery good a 3S? or should i use a 1330 MAh 4S?
You should probably check that the motor can take 4S with the 10 x 4.5 prop. That sounds like a lot of power depending on the motor you have.

Can you share the actual motor name / model?

DamoRC
 

kdobson83

Active member
#7
Everything you have described seems gigantic for the FT Flyer. The gear you have, depending on the motor size, could pretty much fly any of the FT larger models. The FT Flyer is one of the smallest. Both of those batteries you listed are pretty big for that plane. I used a tiny 24g hextronic motor with a 12amp ESC and a 500mah 3s and it flew awesome. You can buy those smaller electronics for pretty cheap too, maybe $30 on HobbyKing for everything.

I personally, would not try to install the electronics you listed on a FT Flyer. I would go with a bigger airframe. But, the Flyer takes a whole 30 minutes to scratch build, give it a shot and see what happens. Lol
 
#8
This is the spec on the parts my friend gave me.

Motor Dimensions: Φ27.5* 30mm Shaft Diameter: Φ3.17mm
A2212 motor: KV: 1000
30A brushless ESC: Output: Continuous 30A, Burst 40A up to 10 Secs.
Input Voltage: 2-4 cells lithium battery or 5-12 cells NiCd/NIMh battery. BEC: 2A / 5V
1045 Propellers: Diameter of Shaft: 6.0mm Adjustable by hole adapter (3mm, 3.2mm, 4mm, 5mm, 6mm, 6.35mm, 7.95mm) Thickness of center: 9.7mm Weight: 15 gram/ pair
 

kdobson83

Active member
#9
Yes, that's not a huge motor, but on 3s with that 1045 prop it'll do 700-800 grams of thrust. Your FT Flyer with the battery you have and the electronics you listed, will weight roughly 400-450 grams max. So you will have twice the trust you need on that tiny plane. Lol Like I said, have at it. I bet it fly's, you'll just have to maintain a higher speed to stay up.

My suggestion, build a little bit bigger, or buy some smaller gear. Build the FT Scout, the new full size one, not the mini. It's an awesome trainer and will carry those electronics easily. The FT Simple Storch will too but it's a tad bigger. The FT Simple Cub would be another good option. But like I said before, what's the worst that could happen to try it on the flyer? A bent motor shaft? $1 foam? Give it a go. The FT Flyer is a super quick and easy build.
 

DamoRC

Well-known member
Mentor
#10
I’m with kdobson - that’s a lot of motor for the FT flyer - but give it a shot. I would not recommend running it on 4S with that prop.

DamoRC
 

Brett_N

Active member
#11
Trust me when I say as a "very first setup" that will be incredibly frustrating and disappointing. It's exactly what I started with and blew through about $10 in props before figuring out I was way overpowered with a 3S, and way too heavy for a 2S.

Now, that setup works perfectly fine with any of the other planes - it's my standard go to power pack for pretty much everything.

Having built about 15 planes now around that motor pack? Start with the Cub or even an old Fogey while you're waiting for a lightweight setup in the mail. If you can find a pusher prop locally, go with the FT Explorer.

For what it's worth? I fly that 2212 motor setup on my giant nut, which is 2x the regular nutball and comes in AUW around 660grams.

Banggood, hobbyking, or any of those guys have the little 24g motors cheap. just make sure the ESC comes with a battery eleminator (BEC) as I've made that mistake also. Or support the guys and pick up a powerpack.
 

DamoRC

Well-known member
Mentor
#12
Trust me when I say as a "very first setup" that will be incredibly frustrating and disappointing. It's exactly what I started with and blew through about $10 in props before figuring out I was way overpowered with a 3S.
I take back what I said earlier. Sure, I’d give it a go, but as Brett points out, it would be a challenge to fly and if this is going to be your first RC experience, it’s not going to be fun. Kudos to Brett for thinking bigger picture on this.

DamoRC
 

donalson

Active member
#13
I'm puzzled by the responses of this being too big of a setup... is it the motor/esc combo?... the battery size? or what?

the reason I'm puzzled is that the FT page has the b or c power pack with a 2200 3s on the 3 pack swapable page... that motor is a 2213-935KV and a 20a esc with a 10x45 and 9x45 prop...

I'm planning on building something bigger fairly quickly anyway.
 

Brett_N

Active member
#14
it ends up being a weight issue. When I started, I was under the impression that Bigger motor - no problem.

Problem with bigger motor is it needs a bigger battery, and a 2200mAH is heavy. The motor is heavy, and getting the balance right is a bear. The Flyer and the nutball like to fly slow - you should be able to fly them at zero forward speed in about 10mph wind. Actually, I've found MOST of the FT planes like to fly slower than you think they should.

Also, it's not an issue of "too much power" - rather (and don't take offense, we all learn this eventually) it's more of a matter of "too much power for a beginner." We "think" we need to hammer the throttle, and that leads to bad things. FWIW - my regular size nutball on an 1806 or 24g outrunner will fly just fine at 10% throttle. When you're learning, speed is not your friend - at all. Things simply happen to fast and you end up with broken props and pieces of foam.

Did you buy a kit? Or print one out? If it's a kit, go to dollar tree and buy a couple sheets of foam board and trace it out. Use the cheap stuff first and crash crash crash.

Try it out - the worst thing that's going to happen is a busted prop and mashed up foam. I've yet to bend a motor shaft, but I've recycled about $30 worth of foam by now :) (but I like building and trying stuff out and have something like 15 planes now)

I'm simply going on experience and want folks to have a good one rather than (like me) a "I'm stubborn and I'm going to make this work right" LOL

But - if you want to fly more than build, drop down a motor size.
 

donalson

Active member
#15
it ends up being a weight issue. When I started, I was under the impression that Bigger motor - no problem.

Problem with bigger motor is it needs a bigger battery, and a 2200mAH is heavy. The motor is heavy, and getting the balance right is a bear. The Flyer and the nutball like to fly slow - you should be able to fly them at zero forward speed in about 10mph wind. Actually, I've found MOST of the FT planes like to fly slower than you think they should.

Also, it's not an issue of "too much power" - rather (and don't take offense, we all learn this eventually) it's more of a matter of "too much power for a beginner." We "think" we need to hammer the throttle, and that leads to bad things. FWIW - my regular size nutball on an 1806 or 24g outrunner will fly just fine at 10% throttle. When you're learning, speed is not your friend - at all. Things simply happen to fast and you end up with broken props and pieces of foam.

Did you buy a kit? Or print one out? If it's a kit, go to dollar tree and buy a couple sheets of foam board and trace it out. Use the cheap stuff first and crash crash crash.

Try it out - the worst thing that's going to happen is a busted prop and mashed up foam. I've yet to bend a motor shaft, but I've recycled about $30 worth of foam by now :) (but I like building and trying stuff out and have something like 15 planes now)

I'm simply going on experience and want folks to have a good one rather than (like me) a "I'm stubborn and I'm going to make this work right" LOL

But - if you want to fly more than build, drop down a motor size.

thanks for the clarification...

I bought the kit... I figured it'd start with me getting 3 power pods/firewalls, landing gear etc to start out with the swapables... I did buy some pushrods and control horns so I can scratch build other planes fairly soon... I've been debating what I want to build next... until I get my parts from china though I get to enjoy my sims :)
 

Brett_N

Active member
#16
Got a dollar tree or wally world close by??

My advice is don't wait for the slow boat from china. If you've got a $tree, go grab some foam, trace the planes that you bought, and go out and crash them.

If you've got access to a printer, or wanna spend a couple bucks, blow the basic plans (sponz plan index) up to 150%, cut 'em out and build them.

Planes that look good built make you look good. Ugly planes that fly, and you made them yourself, make YOU FEEL good. It's all about fun, experimenting, and getting out.

I started 20+ years ago when you had to build all this crap out of blasa and paper (and dope!) - 6 months to fly for 5 minutes - if you were lucky. DTFB, cheap electrics, and FT have made this fun. Don't get me wrong I love my "purchased planes" (although they're somewhat boring) but there's satisfaction showing up at the local park with $3 worth of foam that flies. And it sparks conversation with beginners and veterans alike. And the vet's are always eager to help.
 

donalson

Active member
#18
Got a dollar tree or wally world close by??

My advice is don't wait for the slow boat from china. If you've got a $tree, go grab some foam, trace the planes that you bought, and go out and crash them.

If you've got access to a printer, or wanna spend a couple bucks, blow the basic plans (sponz plan index) up to 150%, cut 'em out and build them.

Planes that look good built make you look good. Ugly planes that fly, and you made them yourself, make YOU FEEL good. It's all about fun, experimenting, and getting out.

I started 20+ years ago when you had to build all this crap out of blasa and paper (and dope!) - 6 months to fly for 5 minutes - if you were lucky. DTFB, cheap electrics, and FT have made this fun. Don't get me wrong I love my "purchased planes" (although they're somewhat boring) but there's satisfaction showing up at the local park with $3 worth of foam that flies. And it sparks conversation with beginners and veterans alike. And the vet's are always eager to help.

ah slow boat from china IS the electronics... although I have thought/planned to pick up and build a few things before that stuff gets here... I've already thought about building a giant nutball... and I really want to build a bloody wonder and either a simple scout or cub
 
#19
I live in Sarnia Ontario and I orded from Toronto Ontario Gratest Hobbys hobby shop has a wearhouse there. I bleave there the canadian Flite Test partner.