• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Painting Pro Tips

Ace2317

Senior Member
#1
I'm pretty well-versed in spray painting, but I've yet to paint foam board. Any good tips anyone wants to share? I'll be painting a Spitfire, by the way.
 
#2
I spray painted my last build and it turned out pretty good. I used no poly or sealant beforehand. Keep the can far away from any exposed foam (spray at a distance). If you get to close the propellants will eat the foam. And of course since your basically spray painting paper use very light coats.

One issue I had was fibers in the paper standing up which I probably could have gotten rid of by lightly sanding between coats but I didn't care.

The hardest part was remeremembering to stick the masking tape to my shirt before applying so it didn't tear the paper. (thanks Peter for the tip). Be careful when masking any tape that you have painted.. The spray paint I was using did not bond to the extreme packing tape very well.
 
Last edited:

Ace2317

Senior Member
#3
I spray painted my last build and it turned out pretty good. I used no poly or sealant beforehand. Keep the can far away from any exposed foam (spray at a distance). If you get to close the propellants will eat the foam. And of course since your basically spray painting paper use very light coats.

One issue I had was fibers in the paper standing up which I probably could have gotten rid of by lightly sanding between coats but I didn't care.

The hardest part was remeremembering to stick the masking tape to my shirt before applying so it didn't tear the paper. (thanks Peter for the tip). Be careful when masking any tape that you have painted.. The spray paint I was using did not bond to the extreme packing tape very well.
Have you ever used painter's tape when taping over coats? I wonder if it would come off more easily, but still hold a good enough seal.
 

Winglet

Active member
#4
You can go a lot of directions from just simply spray painting with almost any old enamel in lite coats as described above to creating a really slick finish by investing a little extra time. The simple spray paint job isn't bad. It usually looks pretty good and you just don't have any time invested in it. If you don't think the airplane is going to have a very long life span then this is probably the way to go.

My slickest paint job ever on DTFB was created by Minwaxing the whole airplane and letting it dry 24 hours. I followed it with lite coats of Krylon (I think) after about the second coat I started sanding the whole airplane between coats with 320 grit sand paper and ultimately 600 grit before the final coat. The finish was amazing in the end. It looked like the whole airplane was expertly covered in Monokote! It really didn't require a lot of work, just patients in sanding and waiting for the paint to completely dry between coats. Hope this helps?

Mike
 

Ace2317

Senior Member
#5
You can go a lot of directions from just simply spray painting with almost any old enamel in lite coats as described above to creating a really slick finish by investing a little extra time. The simple spray paint job isn't bad. It usually looks pretty good and you just don't have any time invested in it. If you don't think the airplane is going to have a very long life span then this is probably the way to go.

My slickest paint job ever on DTFB was created by Minwaxing the whole airplane and letting it dry 24 hours. I followed it with lite coats of Krylon (I think) after about the second coat I started sanding the whole airplane between coats with 320 grit sand paper and ultimately 600 grit before the final coat. The finish was amazing in the end. It looked like the whole airplane was expertly covered in Monokote! It really didn't require a lot of work, just patients in sanding and waiting for the paint to completely dry between coats. Hope this helps?

Mike
That sounds awesome. Did the Minwax add a lot of weight?
 

Winglet

Active member
#6
I don't think it adds any at all. Just wipe it on and then wipe all of it off that you can. I've found the poster board sections. (IE turtledecks) usually need an extra treatment of Minwax. The paper seems to try to soak up the paint and that causes some splotches.
 

Ace2317

Senior Member
#7
I don't think it adds any at all. Just wipe it on and then wipe all of it off that you can. I've found the poster board sections. (IE turtledecks) usually need an extra treatment of Minwax. The paper seems to try to soak up the paint and that causes some splotches.
Wow. Very cool. I'll definitely give that a shot. Thanks!
 
#8
Have you ever used painter's tape when taping over coats? I wonder if it would come off more easily, but still hold a good enough seal.
Blue painters tape is exactly what I was using. Like I said the paint just didn't bond very well to some extreme packing tape that was reinforcing the nose of the plane. I never noticed any paint being pulled off the foamboard itself.
 

Ace2317

Senior Member
#9
Blue painters tape is exactly what I was using. Like I said the paint just didn't bond very well to some extreme packing tape that was reinforcing the nose of the plane. I never noticed any paint being pulled off the foamboard itself.
Great. Thanks!
 

Lorenzo

Senior Member
#10
My slickest paint job ever on DTFB was created by Minwaxing the whole airplane and letting it dry 24 hours.
What type of MinWax sealant did you use? I've read some conflicting reports about the various types and their safe or destructive qualities when applied to DTFB.

Thanks,
Lorenzo
 
#13
Minwax

I used Minwax, brushed, on my F-22 (Not the water based) as described in the painting video and it ate the foam on the edges where the foam was bare... how can you seal the foam so that it won't be affected by the Minwax Polyurethane or by the paint?...
I have used the water based Polyurethane on bare foam before and it worked OK protecting it from the paint from spray cans. However, on the video they say not to use water based as it would remove the paper.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
Last edited:

Jaxx

Posted a thousand or more times
#14
I used the oil-based Minwax without any issues. I saturated the paper with a 2" foam brush, then wiped off the excess with a paper towel. The only thing I noticed was that it softened up the hot glue. Once it cured, everything was fine. I didn't experience any foam damage or warping. Anyone airbrushing their planes? That's the route I'm taking.
 
#15
I used the oil-based Minwax without any issues. I saturated the paper with a 2" foam brush, then wiped off the excess with a paper towel. The only thing I noticed was that it softened up the hot glue. Once it cured, everything was fine. I didn't experience any foam damage or warping. Anyone airbrushing their planes? That's the route I'm taking.
Unfortunately, here we have Minwax in the water based or the other which is slow drying (I guess it is oil based - it does not say on the can) and it did affect the foam somewhat... I brushed it on and then wiped with a paper towel also... I did brush some on the edges because I thought it would protect the foam from the paint and that it would bind the paper to the foam, better. I guess I was wrong or the product that I have available, is different than the one in the US. Tough luck as I love building with foam board.
Thanks...
 
#17
Has anyone tried using water based acrylic paint with a spray gun? i.e. ceiling white?
I have a set of spray guns that came with my air compressor - they're no DeVilbiss but they do ok and can spray extremely light coats if necessary. Now that it's not stupidly hot in Adelaide I might give it a test on the remains of my Flyer, but hearing someone else's experience is easier than the time it takes to properly clean a spray gun.