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rc plane Licence

#4
thailand unfourtunately there isnt much info
In that case, I would check with someone in local law enforcement. Show them what you want to fly, and where you want to do it.

Here in the U.S. we are in the midst of sweeping changes in how and where we can fly R/C etc. I am not advocating it, but many here are of the mind that R/C planes are mostly recreational and the government has no business regulating them.
 
#6
i also have a question about batteries... if from the uk origionally and want to bring my batteries back but im not allowed to bring them on the plane... am i allowed to put them in my suitcase or something?
 

JasonK

Fred Banned Me
#7
Yeah definitely. id love to just be able to go out and fly, id just like to do it the proper way. have you got a plane license?
what is or isn't relevent in the US, doesn't apply to where your at, every country hase different laws, so asking what the law is in the US won't answer your question.

i also have a question about batteries... if from the uk origionally and want to bring my batteries back but im not allowed to bring them on the plane... am i allowed to put them in my suitcase or something?
last I checked, storage changed lipos in a proper storage bag can be in your carry on (at least here in the US), so you might want to recheck that. There are typically limits on big batteries, but smaller ones tend to not be an issue. But again, this is something to check with the airlines/local rules to see what you can/cannot do, vs ask what can be done in the US.
 
#8
Yeah definitely. id love to just be able to go out and fly, id just like to do it the proper way. have you got a plane license?
Currently, this year, you do not need a "license" to fly R/C in the U.S. as long as it is for recreational purposes, below 55 lbs. However, the FAA requires all R/C pilots to register and put their registration number on each plane/drone/etc. If you do any R/C flying for compensation, even YouTube, you must also have an FAA Remote Pilot Certificate (also known as a "Part 107 license"). I have a Part 107 license, which is granted by the FAA by simply asking for it because I have numerous other FAA certificates: ATP, CFI/II/MEI, etc.
 
#10
Currently, this year, you do not need a "license" to fly R/C in the U.S. as long as it is for recreational purposes, below 55 lbs. However, the FAA requires all R/C pilots to register and put their registration number on each plane/drone/etc. If you do any R/C flying for compensation, even YouTube, you must also have an FAA Remote Pilot Certificate (also known as a "Part 107 license"). I have a Part 107 license, which is granted by the FAA by simply asking for it because I have numerous other FAA certificates: ATP, CFI/II/MEI, etc.
That's actually annoying
 

boogieloo

Active member
#18
I don't think so. I don't think the FAA will even know you have a model airplane to fly. There are thousands of model airplane builders and flyers in America. I don't think the FAA enforces these rules at the parks or runways where ever you fly. So it's relax on the issue of licensing.