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ScratchWarbirds BF 109 F-2 / G Build

Fallegon

Active member
#21
Well, all the pages have measurments on them. The formers are scaled properly to the page, but the other pieces are too big to fit on printer paper. Even if you could print out the larger pieces you would still need to measure a ton of lines within the perimeter. It would be nicer to look at though than a crummy picture. To me it just makes sense to print it out draw your lines and cut. I dont really see how you could do this without getting a ruler out and measuring your lines. Not trying to sound rude or anything. I also dont know much about cad or if it improve the process.
 

Jaxx

Posted a thousand or more times
#22
Fallegon,
Actually, you might be able to replicate your plans using Inkscape. It's a free vector graphics editor (like Adobe Illustrator). It would allow you to trace your hand-drawn plans and export them as a PDF. It is pretty easy to use (lots of tutorials on YouTube), and while you learning how to use a CAD program, you could be cranking out PDF plans with your current design process. Here is the link to the site: https://inkscape.org/

If you're interested, I can post some links to the YouTube tutorials I have been watching in order to learn how to use it.
 

Fallegon

Active member
#23
yeah I use kira to touch up the scans but trying to manipulate the images to come out crisper was kinda a hastle and I couldnt really get it right. If spending more time drawing out plans like that is what everyone would prefer then Ill work on it. I know from my point of view it all seems fine cause like, I designed it lol, but the point of these builds is to take these foam planes to the next level. It was never my intention to make it fool proof simple, however if the plans are too tough to understand then Ill re work it.
 

DamoRC

Elite member
Mentor
#24
I think it will be well worth your while picking up some CAD skills - Inkscape is pretty common but my preferred is Sketchup. Looking at the plans, I think most of it is serviceable for builders - just the larger parts where the measurements would be needed could be made a little easier.

Although I totally get the idea around not needing to make it idiot proof (some of my plans can be quite the challenge), given that you clearly have some skills on the design side, by making the plans as easy to follow as possible, you will find (hopefully) that more folks who see the initial pics and think "wow - that's cool" will take the next step and actually build your design. When you see someone else build and fly one of your designs its a huge buzz.

DamoRC
 

Chuppster

Well-known member
#26
Well, all the pages have measurments on them. The formers are scaled properly to the page, but the other pieces are too big to fit on printer paper. Even if you could print out the larger pieces you would still need to measure a ton of lines within the perimeter. It would be nicer to look at though than a crummy picture. To me it just makes sense to print it out draw your lines and cut. I dont really see how you could do this without getting a ruler out and measuring your lines. Not trying to sound rude or anything. I also dont know much about cad or if it improve the process.
From my point of view, I'd say your design can be replicated with the provided plans. However, given the time and effort I'd have to invest into trying to figure out how they work, it's just not worth it for me to try. That's my 2 cents. Others may be more motivated. What gets me is that it's such a neat design with a lot of good techniques that I would love to explore (and I'm sure many of us would want to as well) but I fear the lack of polish on the plans is going to be an obstacle.

From my experience, it's quicker to draw in CAD than it is in real life, once you get used to it. And it's far more accurate. I picked up InkScape in about an hour, and once I got the hang of it it does what I need. I'll be trying CAD for my next design attempt, though. As for the problem that some pieces won't fit on a 9x11 sheet of paper, that's true of all Flite Test plans. I've printed many a plan in tiled mode though, and it doesn't take me long (about 5-10 minutes) to tape those printer sheets into 8x2 sheet grids.

If you draw everything up in CAD (like Flite Test with all the pieces templated), I would love to beta build this for you. It looks like a great design! I'm NOT trying to shame you for doing things your way. I just want to point out that while your way may work for you, it's not working for me, and from my point of view it won't be easy for most other people as well. I really appreciate you sharing the design and build video with us and I want to be helpful! I have seen you around the forum and I love how you share your build processes with us.

Can I ask, have you done a FliteTest build before?
 

Fallegon

Active member
#27
I will work on cleaning it up a bit more. Does the video help at all with the process, did I leave anything out, or make anything more confusing. Lets leave the video quality and editing aspect out of it for now :p
 

Chuppster

Well-known member
#28
I will work on cleaning it up a bit more. Does the video help at all with the process, did I leave anything out, or make anything more confusing. Lets leave the video quality and editing aspect out of it for now :p
I would say the video is helpful in that it shows you how to use your plans. Otherwise I would have been completely clueless when I looked at them! I think the video is good, and I recognize the editing takes time, so I can't blame you for it not being perfect (but really it's not too bad).
 
#29
Have said elsewhere how good I think this is.
As a newbie I was puzzled why all foam ww2 warbirds had square noses.
I like them to have rounded noses and a decent propeller cone.
Thought the reason they were square was to let air in to cool motor or because of square firewall but clearly you’ve proo it doesn’t,t have to be like that!