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The Second Part of my Journey - The Diary

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
@mayan my friend, that is a hurtful crash. Torn wires are a terrible thing to see. :( Usually repairable on those little clips, just a pain the backside. The time and money you will save having to do needless and constant repair justifies the cost of a better trans, in my opinion. It will quickly pay for itself. If you pick the right one, you'll be able to get receivers dirt cheap of Ali and you'll have multiple birds in the air in no time.

I know you are not even close to being discouraged, you don't seem to know the meaning of the word. Keep flying my friend. Hopefully I'll be in the air (and in the ground) with you again, very soon. :)
 

mayan

Well-known member
@mayan my friend, that is a hurtful crash. Torn wires are a terrible thing to see. :( Usually repairable on those little clips, just a pain the backside. The time and money you will save having to do needless and constant repair justifies the cost of a better trans, in my opinion. It will quickly pay for itself. If you pick the right one, you'll be able to get receivers dirt cheap of Ali and you'll have multiple birds in the air in no time.

I know you are not even close to being discouraged, you don't seem to know the meaning of the word. Keep flying my friend. Hopefully I'll be in the air (and in the ground) with you again, very soon. :)
I love you man!
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
I still think straight up or down (do you know if the transmitter has a second antenna?)

They should point generally the same way. (Don’t make me sick @Hai-Lee on you.) 🤣

Pretty sure antenna orientation is what dismembered my night radian.
The radiolink has only a single Antenna on the Tx and a single antenna on the Rx.

Apart from making sure that the radio Rx antenna is clear of all reflective obstacles the only real thing he can do is to ensure that the Tx and the Rx antennas are always parallel to each other and definitely NEVER point at each other! That is very difficult for him as he does not fly in flat and level circuits.

There is an old trick for use over relatively short range that can help a little and that is to bend the active part of the Rx antenna in the middle at right angles. Because it reduces the antenna efficiency the range is reduced but you do get a margin of dual polarity transmission.

There are other solutions but honestly without a source of cheap or free specialised WiFi antennas it would be cheaper to just buy a new Tx/Rx combo!

Have fun!
 

Wildthing

Well-known member
On my TX I have the antenna at 90 degrees and parallel to the ground so basically laying flat . Straight up and down is no good (so I am told) ;)
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
On my TX I have the antenna at 90 degrees and parallel to the ground so basically laying flat . Straight up and down is no good (so I am told) ;)
If you mean the trans antenna, what you want is straight up and down. Straight out sends the blade straight up and straight down with a small cone coming off the tip.

My mistake was I had the trans antenna pointed to the side. That sent the blade of the signal in a wide horizontal swath, but not so much vertically. With the trans antenna pointed up, the blade goes out in a wide vertical swath, and you just keep the trans pointed at the plane.
 

mayan

Well-known member
Thanks for all the great ideas my friends. The anthena on my Tx is fixed up and can't be changed :(, but on the fix I did yesterday I have the abiltiy to spin the plastic tube that holds the anthena so I'll try different angles on Wendesday to see what works the best.

parallel to the ground so basically laying flat
That is how I had it when I lost signal and crashed :(.
 

FDS

Well-known member
If you imagine a 500m wide donut hanging off your antennae, which is less dense near the edges, that’s pretty much what your signal looks like. There’s nothing over the end of the antenna at all, that’s the hole in the donut.
You don’t want it near any metal or motors and you want the donut to overlap with the one from your TX as much as possible. In theory underneath will only generate dead spots if you point the TX antenna at the plane or if you fly overhead of the TX, both of which are bad habits to get into.
 

mayan

Well-known member
Thanks for all the great tips, I will give the anthena position try either today or tomorrow, and report back with my findings.
 

kilroy07

Well-known member
Another way to visualize;
If your tx ant is like this I (pointed straight up) as well as your receiver I, drawing lines between them there’s a lot of places they intersect. I=I (good)
However, if one is rotated I— there’s only a small point they interact, like a cross + (bad)

Yet another way is taking 2 soda cans (or your favorite beverage, donuts are a tad more true to the actual shape of the wave, but cans illustrate the point better) set them on a table, and slide them together. There’s a point up and down the length of the cans where they touch. Good.
Lay one on its side, and there’s just a small point where they touch.

Maybe that’ll help... or maybe I’ve just confused you more... 😂
 

mayan

Well-known member
Quick question for you all. In regards to an issue I have with the rudder of the mini edge see here: https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/servo-jitters.58097/

I think the problem is the large control surface and the torque the servo can produce. So thinking of changing it to a 9g servo. Question is, will a 9g servo on one side of the fuselage have a major effect of the plane in flight? Do I need to change both tail servos to 9g?

What’s your thoughts?