• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

36" Northern Pike - 3D Printed Cuda Clone (It Flies & STL's are Posted!)

localfiend

I like 3D printers...
Mentor
Yeah, I looked at things again. Wasn't thinking about the size and layer height. That's way more big pieces on the build plate than you can fit with the big plane. Also, my settings for the .3mm nozzle are a bit slower. It's probably close to realistic.

Printing less parts at a time is more efficient when it comes to printing speed. If the printer doesn't have to move from part to part, it's faster. I'd reccomend printing the parts in batches the way I have them in my g-code files.

It'l be faster, and if something messes up, you're out a lot less.

As an example, in my g-code, I print the left and right sections of wing 1, and that's it. That'd be a good place to start.

I generally aim for 12 hour prints for PETG as the nozzle can build up plastic, which ends up on the parts. Sometimes it can even leave a hole if you don't pause in the middle of a print to clean it. PLA can go a lot longer, but overnight ish times seems to be a good cycle for starting the next batch.
 
Yeah, I looked at things again. Wasn't thinking about the size and layer height. That's way more big pieces on the build plate than you can fit with the big plane. Also, my settings for the .3mm nozzle are a bit slower. It's probably close to realistic.

Printing less parts at a time is more efficient when it comes to printing speed. If the printer doesn't have to move from part to part, it's faster. I'd reccomend printing the parts in batches the way I have them in my g-code files.

It'l be faster, and if something messes up, you're out a lot less.

As an example, in my g-code, I print the left and right sections of wing 1, and that's it. That'd be a good place to start.

I generally aim for 12 hour prints for PETG as the nozzle can build up plastic, which ends up on the parts. Sometimes it can even leave a hole if you don't pause in the middle of a print to clean it. PLA can go a lot longer, but overnight ish times seems to be a good cycle for starting the next batch.
I have wondered about the pause feature. Is it worthwhile to pause the print and clean the nozzle if I see something building up? Is there a better time to pause than others (such as when the head is on it's way to another piece)?

I've been scared to try it.
 

localfiend

I like 3D printers...
Mentor
I have wondered about the pause feature. Is it worthwhile to pause the print and clean the nozzle if I see something building up? Is there a better time to pause than others (such as when the head is on it's way to another piece)?

I've been scared to try it.
I believe with the newer firmware on prusa printers if you hit pause print, it'l finish the line it's on and move off the the side and lock in place. You can then clean it off then hit resume and it'l go back to work.

Easy to test on something simple after only a few layers have been printed.
 
I believe with the newer firmware on prusa printers if you hit pause print, it'l finish the line it's on and move off the the side and lock in place. You can then clean it off then hit resume and it'l go back to work.

Easy to test on something simple after only a few layers have been printed.
Good point, I will have to give it a try and see how it works.

Do you have a preferred vendor for spare parts, nozzles and such.? My kid thinks she is going to take over my printer... I want to allow her the freedom to learn, and with that I expect some accidents to happen.
 

Wildthing

Well-known member
I did that... kinda weird that it is saying that. I am going off your recommended settings. I'll mess with it when I go back home
I like printing one piece at a time (unless it is something like control horns) , less chance of stringers and way better print because it doesn't have to travel from part to part.

Also if something screws up half way through you didn't ruin as many parts plus less time wasted.
 

chris398mx

Well-known member
I like printing one piece at a time (unless it is something like control horns) , less chance of stringers and way better print because it doesn't have to travel from part to part.

Also if something screws up half way through you didn't ruin as many parts plus less time wasted.
i usually do 2 parts, just so i can keep the printer running for longer times when at work or over night. I do agree though, that 1 pc at a time will make less stringers.
 

localfiend

I like 3D printers...
Mentor
I just printed this fuse piece, and it came out flawless
At the tiny size you may be able to get away without internal structure on the fuse base. You're gonna want to change your settings though, that should have printed with spars. On the 36" Pike there's a Cura profile that should work with the new versions of cura. It'l let you slice the parts with the internals intact. You'll still need to change the settings to suit the .3mm nozzle though.
 

localfiend

I like 3D printers...
Mentor
I like printing one piece at a time (unless it is something like control horns) , less chance of stringers and way better print because it doesn't have to travel from part to part.

Also if something screws up half way through you didn't ruin as many parts plus less time wasted.
One piece at a time can work for some things, for others though, it can greatly decrease strength because of how you have to adjust your heat settings. All of my g-codes are optimized so that you get the best strength, which can necessitate printing more than one part at a time so that things have enough time to cool down.

Sometimes, if you cool down the temp enough to only print one part without it melting or having quality issues, it won't be as strong as it could be when paired with another part and printed at a higher temperature.
 

SquirrelTail

Well-known member
At the tiny size you may be able to get away without internal structure on the fuse base. You're gonna want to change your settings though, that should have printed with spars. On the 36" Pike there's a Cura profile that should work with the new versions of cura. It'l let you slice the parts with the internals intact. You'll still need to change the settings to suit the .3mm nozzle though.
That's weird... I have no idea why they aren't printing. I went off your settings..
 

Wildthing

Well-known member
One piece at a time can work for some things, for others though, it can greatly decrease strength because of how you have to adjust your heat settings. All of my g-codes are optimized so that you get the best strength, which can necessitate printing more than one part at a time so that things have enough time to cool down.

Sometimes, if you cool down the temp enough to only print one part without it melting or having quality issues, it won't be as strong as it could be when paired with another part and printed at a higher temperature.
I don't understand how printing one piece versus multiple especially from multiple to a single would lessen the strength with the same settings. Using high temp for everything minus the last few layers with a cooler temp I don't usually have any melting problems.
 
Fuselage sections are done. I had some issues with the internal structures on one section of the fuselage. I was able to save it by babysitting and just clipping the mess out as it tried to extrude on air. I tested the pause feature and it stops immediately rather than continue the current line. One thing I dont like is that it immediately starts cooling the head and restarting then takes some time and the doesnt immediately bond when it returns.

The wing sections 1 also had a small issue inside and the skin has some stringers that aren't completely adhered to each other on the compound curve. I will use a small silkspan patch in that area with some CA so it doesnt turn into a big hole. Otherwise it is going well.

These were all printed from the gcode and I dropped the nozzle temp 5 degrees at the 4.0 layer
 

Attachments

Made more progress. Still having issues hitting the internal rib structures to print. They do ok at first but inevitably I end up with a piece of filament sticking up a bit when it's trying to jump the gap on the holes then the nozzle catches on it and things go sideways. Other times the structures print fine. I'm not sure how to troubleshoot this so I just babysit it and use pause when it gets bad.
20200315_223349.jpg
20200315_223317.jpg