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Covering with kraft paper

#1
Peter's method of waterproofing his planes applies to all foamboard planes. It covers the ragged simi-peeling edges of creations that makes our planes stand apart from commercial produced models. Provides solid base for painting and gives more durability. It allows for integration of other materials as for turtlebacks (rounded tops on fuses) out of insulation foam and cowlings. The general idea is not new as similar technics were used with elmers glue. After covering two fuses and one wing I am sold on the idea. Using white paper instead of brown paper may not be as strong??? but it gives and easier base to color. Too much paint (weight) can change the flying characteristics. The more people try this method, the more refinements will popup. It's the difference between building a plane to fly and building a flying model.
 

Maingear

Flugzeug Liebhaber
#2
I have been looking for a white heavy weight paper, however a colored wrap decal would be the best solution for me, I go nuts masking and touching up paint jobs.

I would love to do a Flite Test cammo wrap made of the Flite test logo on a warbird!
 

RAM

Posted a thousand or more times
#3
sailorJohn,

I got an idea from your recent article. In the article you soaked then removed the adams foam board with polycrylic, then painted the bare foam with polycrylic and finally replaced the soaked paper.

What do you think about using the airplane plans as the paper instead of the Adams paper. It wouldn't really add any steps to your process but now you would have a paintable plane with the additional benefit of having the plans already on the board.
 
#4
I have been looking for a white heavy weight paper, however a colored wrap decal would be the best solution for me, I go nuts masking and touching up paint jobs.

I would love to do a Flite Test cammo wrap made of the Flite test logo on a warbird!
I bought the 48 in brown heavy wrapping paper but I found the finish was rough and course and hard to cover the brown with paint.I found that masking paper which is thinner gave a smoother surface works better. But I am about to sacrifice a board stripping the white paper by soaking it with poly ,soaking the fuse then apply it to the model ,will see it that works.
 

jhitesma

Some guy in the desert
Mentor
#5
You may want to try HP's designjet paper:
http://www.staples.com/HP-Designjet...ite-24-W-x-150-L-21-lbs-1-Roll/product_810766

It's also available in larger rolls. Though I'm a little disappointed to see the price has gone up $5 in just one year! (Dec 2013 it was only $14.58 after taxes with free deliver to my local store)

It's pretty thick and sturdy...definitely stronger than kraft paper and a very bright white. Though it may weigh more and may not conform to curves as well as a result. I've been using it for printing my plans on but I'm seriously considering trying it instead of poster board for turtle decks and such.
 
#6
Honestly I'm building my turtle decks out of insulation foam then covering the fuse with poly and paper not that much weight and easier and more finished. My goal is to build a plane that will last and be similar to those from the 60,s and 70's. I just don't like the ft under camber wings they just don't look right, kind of throw away. Trying washout instead to prevent tip stalling.
 
#7
Hi guy s

my input on the matter i peel off the paper draw with a marks and the seal it with clear packing tape. it works good and it make it lighter cause almost all ft plane are tail heavy.