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First Time Scratch Build

#1
I am just starting to get into the hobby and am working on making a mini arrow. I decided to run out and get dollar tree foam board instead of ordering a speed build kit (bad idea?). I have had the plans printed out full scale and am about to begin construction. My question is to whether the paper the plans are printed on stays on the plane after all the pieces are cut or whether it is removed. I bought some M3 Super 77 (saw it in the how to paint foamboard video) and was wondering if it would come off too easily while building or not want to come off at all if it is supposed to. Just need a little clarification, thank you for the help.
 

tamuct01

Active member
#2
I usually print out the plans, tape them together, and then glue them to the foamboard. After cutting out the pieces and transferring any additional markings, I remove the plans and toss it. Others glue the plans to posterboard to make reusable templates. It's really up to you. I wouldn't leave the plans glued to the foamboard unless it was really stuck and would damage the foam/paper to remove it.
 

JimCR120

Got Lobstah?
Site Moderator
#4
Another option is to print, tape, and cut out the paper pieces and then pin them to the board with some push pins to hold it in place. Then I trace around with a wide tip marker all the places I need to cut. After that the paper templates get folded up and saved for making any replacement parts and the foam gets cut where indicated by the markings now on the foam.

I cannot say my way is better or worse than anyone else's since I haven't tried their but it seems to me to be just a little bit less of a hassle.
 

tamuct01

Active member
#5
The last glue I got was the Elmer's spray glue. It holds just fine and releases easy enough, but does seem to leave a bit of residue. It's easily sanded off, though. I plan to try the 3M Super 77 next.
 
#6
I had the plans for my arrow printed out to full size, then transferred them to posterboard, then traced the posterboard plans onto the foamboard. This way, if/when I want to make another, I still have all the templates.
 

Jugsy

New member
#7
You definitely need to remove the plans afterwards, you don't want excess weight! I like using cheap and nasty roll-up glue sticks, it can leave some residue but easy to remove with patience. I've heard people have success with "repositionable" glues.

The mini arrow is a beautiful craft and a really satisfying build, but I'd make sure you learn to fly on something a little bit kinder. It's a fast and agile wing, which while being a lot of fun, requires you to have some muscle memory already developed. You really don't get a lot of time to correct, and while it's perfectly stable in experienced hands, it doesn't have any of the nice trainer characteristics - if you point it at the ground, it'll go in to the ground, fast.
 

ItsOK

Junior Member
#8
Hey guys!
I recently made the mini-corsair. It's 65% done (body is complete, some servos are in etc). What is bothering me is that I bought the Emaxx 2213-935kv motor instead of the recommended one. The motor I have is specified for multi-rotor drones, and I was wondering whether it is possible to use it on a mini. Another thing I had a problem with was the Firewall. I have no idea how to mount one to the pod. Help is appreciated!
 

galorin

Junior Member
#9
Hey guys!
I recently made the mini-corsair. It's 65% done (body is complete, some servos are in etc). What is bothering me is that I bought the Emaxx 2213-935kv motor instead of the recommended one. The motor I have is specified for multi-rotor drones, and I was wondering whether it is possible to use it on a mini. Another thing I had a problem with was the Firewall. I have no idea how to mount one to the pod. Help is appreciated!
Maybe start a new thread? I would love to know as well. I am still new, but it's my thinking that the high kv motor they use is so they can use a small prop and get enough thrust and ground clearance. Trivia: Ground clearance is why the Vought F4U Corsair has gull wings and a 4 bladed prop.

If you used that particular motor, you would be looking at spinning a 9-10" prop, and getting all sorts of badness like breaking your prop every time you land and other big prop problems.