• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

FTFC20 Force One by SquirrelTail

SquirrelTail

Well-known member
#21
Can't wait to see this take shape. I mentioned earlier in this thread how I like the plane and it is cool because it uses an AET scheme instead of elevons. That was designed before mixing, and it's neat, but not efficient. With a tailless bird like that I wouldn't copy that feature(I have before, it works, but clunkier). Just use elevons and it will be simpler. Other than that, the design is a really straight forward prop in slot delta.
Yep! I drew up one wing for it the other day and put elevons for it.
 

jfaleo1

Junior Member
#22
Can't wait to see this take shape. I mentioned earlier in this thread how I like the plane and it is cool because it uses an AET scheme instead of elevons. That was designed before mixing, and it's neat, but not efficient. With a tailless bird like that I wouldn't copy that feature(I have before, it works, but clunkier). Just use elevons and it will be simpler. Other than that, the design is a really straight forward prop in slot delta.
Actually it was not “before mixing”. We had mixing it was just mechanically done rather than electronic. Which by the way is how it is actually done in most full scale non-fly by wire aircraft. This designer simply used an easy control setup for accessibility for more people. Yes, I remember the original magazine article came out I thought it was so cool.
 

Vimana89

Well-known member
#23
Actually it was not “before mixing”. We had mixing it was just mechanically done rather than electronic. Which by the way is how it is actually done in most full scale non-fly by wire aircraft. This designer simply used an easy control setup for accessibility for more people. Yes, I remember the original magazine article came out I thought it was so cool.
Yeah mechanically mixing sounds much more complex. The AET version would have been an easier more accessible setup back then. It would still work today, but requires a third servo and linkage. Back when I was much sloppier at linking and didn't trust myself setting up elevons(which wasn't long ago), such a setup would have appealed to me. Now it's just an extra servo and linkage on a tailless plane that might as well use elevons. Thanks for clarifying that mixing was available in the 80's when that plane came out though, I'm still learning a lot about how RC worked in previous decades.
 
Last edited: