• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Gluing Paper back on foamboard

Mr NCT

Elite member
#1
I'm doing shaped wings (master series style) on my new plane but still wanted under camber on the wing tips. So I thought I'd see which glue worked best. I pealed the paper off one side of the FB, shaped the FB and then reapplied the paper. For each glue I spread a thin layer on the foam, let it get tacky and reapplied the paper. After waiting a couple of hours I tried pealing the paper off.


IMG_3443.JPG


Rubber Cement: Didn't peal up on it's own but came off easily
Wood Glue: Strongest bond but couldn't keep it from wrinkling when I put the paper back on
Super 77: After an hour it had fair adhesion, after 2 hours was better
Gorilla Clear: Good adhesion but the messiest of the group
Beacon (from Dollar Tree): Excellent adhesion after an hour, no wrinkles and not messy - The Winner

IMG_3444.JPG
 

CrshNBrn

Elite member
#2
This is helpful. I think I've tried all of these methods in the past....except your winner! I'll have to stop by and pick some Beacon on my next foamboard run. Thanks!
 
#3
I'm doing shaped wings (master series style) on my new plane but still wanted under camber on the wing tips. So I thought I'd see which glue worked best. I pealed the paper off one side of the FB, shaped the FB and then reapplied the paper. For each glue I spread a thin layer on the foam, let it get tacky and reapplied the paper. After waiting a couple of hours I tried pealing the paper off.


View attachment 212845

Rubber Cement: Didn't peal up on it's own but came off easily
Wood Glue: Strongest bond but couldn't keep it from wrinkling when I put the paper back on
Super 77: After an hour it had fair adhesion, after 2 hours was better
Gorilla Clear: Good adhesion but the messiest of the group
Beacon (from Dollar Tree): Excellent adhesion after an hour, no wrinkles and not messy - The Winner

View attachment 212846
Fantastic. Thanks for your efforts @Mr NCT. And I've already got that Beacon stuff from the Dollar Store. (y)
 

Mr NCT

Elite member
#4
I'm going to go back and try the wood glue again and see if thinning it or wetting the paper first would help the paper lay down better. It has the best adhesion but ugly results - at least the way I tried. Share your results.
 

Addicted

Elite member
#5
Great info for builders. brother!
I have been using thin applications of Elmers white glue for a while and find it to be better than the wood glue. Cures fairly quickly, too.
NOTE: In colder temps, it takes longer to cure, and it can sometimes wrinkle.
 
#6
So far for me it has depended completely on the application. There are small places where I've used CA to best advantage. I've used white GG where I could put a flat weight on the piece anyway. Or something with a quicker set in places like the inside of a curve. The inside floor of the center part of my last year's snow skeeter - I removed the paper to make the curve, then after assembly I glued in a new paper floor. Trying to remember what I used. :unsure: I couldn't weigh it down flat...
 
#7
Great info for builders. brother!
I have been using thin applications of Elmers white glue for a while and find it to be better than the wood glue. Cures fairly quickly, too.
NOTE: In colder temps, it takes longer to cure, and it can sometimes wrinkle.
That leads me to think - dare I say it - Mod Podge. :LOL: But seriously, that might be just right for a bunch of applications.
 
#10
Thank you for reminding me, I had meant to test it! My mom went through gallons of the stuff - must be good.
Hearing about your mom is what makes me laugh. I always think I shouldn't let people know I actually have Mod Podge on my workbench. That's how prejudice I was about hot glue - people might think I buy plastic fruits at Michaels and make holiday wreaths out of them for everybody that'll take one and pretend to like it...
 
#13
I had always used wood glue (loctite) to reaffix peeling paper, but it has never been that size of area. I never had it wrinkle unless I laid it on really thick, but it is the quick dry stuff so if you laid it on thin, let it flash, and mashed it down, it would hold.

I haven't tried the beacon, is it with the foam board and stuff or a different section?
 

Mr NCT

Elite member
#14
I had always used wood glue (loctite) to reaffix peeling paper, but it has never been that size of area. I never had it wrinkle unless I laid it on really thick, but it is the quick dry stuff so if you laid it on thin, let it flash, and mashed it down, it would hold.

I haven't tried the beacon, is it with the foam board and stuff or a different section?
It was just down the aisle.
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
#15
Dry brushing White Gorilla Wood glue is my method for reattaching paper or sealing edges so it doesn't peel in the first place. Paper is made from wood so it only makes sense to use wood glue.
 
#16
I had always used wood glue (loctite) to reaffix peeling paper, but it has never been that size of area. I never had it wrinkle unless I laid it on really thick, but it is the quick dry stuff so if you laid it on thin, let it flash, and mashed it down, it would hold.

I haven't tried the beacon, is it with the foam board and stuff or a different section?
Yeah in the craftsy aisle.
To me that Beacon Foam Adhesive is like a "Beacon Foam-Tac Lite". But darned if it doesn't do the job. And it's $1. So you've got nothing to lose.
But for gluing down paper I'm not keen on using anything that acts like a rubber cement - apply to both surfaces, let it tack up, then press together. I get the idea at the end there you're making a glue-to-glue bond. I get a sneaking suspicion that HAS to equal more glue, more weight and a general overkill. And a rubbery final product.


...but does it add weight...?
On the other hand, Mod Podge seems to be like a combination of Elmer's white glue, milk and water. :LOL: I can hardly imagine I'm adding much weight, especially with a whole lot of it being water for real, and that evaporates away.

I always get the idea that if I were using a wood glue it'd maybe be overkill for gluing down paper. It's thicker stuff, no doubt stronger but heavier, etc. Then there's white glue but still a lot for the task. Then Mod Podge which seems to be maybe just the right fit. It's not big bad forces we're dealing with here.
 

Piotrsko

Master member
#18
After 50 years in the hobby, I am no longer sure glue weight matters. Typically someone who has a weight problem is doing other odd stuff that is heavy, too. Anyone ever do just a dried glue weight test?
 
#19
After 50 years in the hobby, I am no longer sure glue weight matters. Typically someone who has a weight problem is doing other odd stuff that is heavy, too. Anyone ever do just a dried glue weight test?
I'm generally with you on that one. "doing other odd stuff that is heavy too" like wonky haphazard build practices with hot glue glopped all over. ;)
A dried glue comparison doesn't give you the answers you're wanting; You have to weigh glued samples. One glue might be twice the density as another, but it might be used at only a small fraction the volume.
But @Mr NCT might have the answer right there, if he wanted to trim down some samples and if he has a scale that's accurate enough. I wouldn't think he'd find significant differences among samples. It depends on what you'd call significant.
 

Mr NCT

Elite member
#20
I'm generally with you on that one. "doing other odd stuff that is heavy too" like wonky haphazard build practices with hot glue glopped all over. ;)
A dried glue comparison doesn't give you the answers you're wanting; You have to weigh glued samples. One glue might be twice the density as another, but it might be used at only a small fraction the volume.
But @Mr NCT might have the answer right there, if he wanted to trim down some samples and if he has a scale that's accurate enough. I wouldn't think he'd find significant differences among samples. It depends on what you'd call significant.
Another great idea. If it's worth doing it's worth over-doing! (see "Still Up a Tree")
My scale only reads to the nearest gram. I trimmed the larger samples to 3" x 6" and weighed them.

Raw foam board with paper on both sides - 3g
Rubber cement - 3g
Wood glue - 3 g
Super 77 - 3g
Mode Podge - 3 g
Beacon (2" x 5") - 2g
Gorilla clear (2" x 5") - 2g

My totally semi-scientific conclusion: @Piotrosko and @Monte.C are right. If your plane is significantly overweight then you must be "doing other odd stuff that is heavy too".