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Look what I found, laying on top of a closet!

Johan

Senior Member
#41
Ok, minor update, finished wing no.2 (and found out WHY you have to build the entire wing in one go, but that is another story...)

Attached the other parts of the fuselage.

Starting to look like a plane...

foto 1.JPG

PS, it is a mock-up, just put the fuselage loosely on top of the wing

foto 2.JPG

foto 3.JPG

Now it is time to get some Balsa, if I want to do an RC conversion. Thanks to you guys I have loads of conversion threads to check out :)

I'll have to sand some balsa parts soon, any tips on grit-size etc?
 
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xuzme720

Dedicated foam bender
Mentor
#42
Balsa is soft so you should only need 100-240 for everything. 100 for shaping and 120, 180, 240 for smoothing, pick grit depending on how close you are to finished shape...
 

Johan

Senior Member
#43
Thanks, xuzme720!

I guess, common sense rules..
I did not want to start too course (before you know it all the hard work is gone ....)
 

xuzme720

Dedicated foam bender
Mentor
#44
on some stuff, 50 or 80 grit is where you want to start but with the small balsa parts, it's too "grabby" and you'll break more than you sand. It takes a little longer but still faster than sanding, repairing, resanding, repairing, more resanding...
 

xuzme720

Dedicated foam bender
Mentor
#46
Oh! almost forgot... get a flat bar or something when sanding the wings to keep the ribs at the same height and the wings smooth. It also makes it easier to shape the leading edge and keep it consistent over the whole span. I bought one of these, but anything flat and solid will work if you add sandpaper to it...
 

Johan

Senior Member
#47
Thanks xuzme720, I was planning to use one of those rectangular 'sanding sponges' (literal translation from Dutch...), similar to what you suggest.
B.T.W You've got a very nice sanding rig (followed the link) :)

But, no sanding yet,
Before I fill up the other side with spars (or what they are called, ringers I
guess) I still have to decide where to put 'RC stuff' and also what stuff to put there :)

It seems like it it is alway a 'chicken - egg' problem, especially if the frame is lightweight:

- How much thrust do you need (if the frame is light it largely depends on the power chain).
- The power chain determines the thrust (and the majority of the weight)

Argh, where to start:
- go light (unbrushed/micro) and see if it works
- go with stuff lying around (1275 Kv, ESC 15 Amp) and probably rip the frame apart or don't get off the ground at all ..
due to the weight...

I just weighed the partially finished frame (wings, vertical tail + half a fuselage): 21 grams (You might be able to see it on the picture).

foto 1.jpg


I mean: add one motor (brushed) and the weight doubles ....
add a 4gr brushed motor and it might be too weak.
 

Johan

Senior Member
#49
Actually, contrary to popular belief, gravity was invented in 1871 by Nikola Tesla.
It depends on how you look at it, in 1687 Newton published his theory of universal gravitation ("old school physics").
Tesla's dynamic theory of gravity takes this more into modern physics modeling it as a unified field theory.
 
#50
Tesla's dynamic theory of gravity takes this more into modern physics modeling it as a unified field theory.
Yes, the Grand Unified Theory, he went on to invent that next. Amazing guy, really. Before his great work of 1871, everyone had to hold on to their pants not to be flung off the earth. Very annoying in general, as beats, corn, carrots and very small animals didn't have any pants to hold onto. Being a farmer wasn't easy back then. Birds otoh, they could just fly downwards should the need arise. Hence farmers started to grow chickens instead of carrots to keep themselves fed - they didn't even have to fly downwards as they were so heavy. Anyways, I think you put your wing on backwards.
 

Johan

Senior Member
#51
Yes, the Grand Unified Theory, he went on to invent that next. Amazing guy, really. Before his great work of 1871, everyone had to hold on to their pants not to be flung off the earth. Very annoying in general, as beats, corn, carrots and very small animals didn't have any pants to hold onto. Being a farmer wasn't easy back then. Birds otoh, they could just fly downwards should the need arise. Hence farmers started to grow chickens instead of carrots to keep themselves fed - they didn't even have to fly downwards as they were so heavy. Anyways, I think you put your wing on backwards.
LOL, yes but on the up side: The RC community in those days did not have to fear crashes, they just saw their planes / copters floating away :)
 
#52
LOL, yes but on the up side: The RC community in those days did not have to fear crashes, they just saw their planes / copters floating away :)
True, but the glider community was not amused. Hitting a thermal could very well be the end of a pleasant day at the field. Little known fact is that most of the space debris in the geosynchronous orbit consists of runaway gliders pre-dating 1871.
 

Johan

Senior Member
#53
True, but the glider community was not amused. Hitting a thermal could very well be the end of a pleasant day at the field. Little known fact is that most of the space debris in the geosynchronous orbit consists of runaway gliders pre-dating 1871.
Lol :) that fact really made my day :)

It probably had NASA's analysts wondering
"These look like deliberate products of intelligent lifeforms"
 
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Johan

Senior Member
#55
Ha!,

Hmmm, but maybe the balsa dust and a random blob of hot glue met and eventually caused the Tunguska event!

Sorry, I've been reading "the hitchhikers guide to the galaxy" too much :)
 

Tritium

Amateur Extra Class K5TWM
#56
Ha!,

Hmmm, but maybe the balsa dust and a random blob of hot glue met and eventually caused the Tunguska event!

Sorry, I've been reading "the hitchhikers guide to the galaxy" too much :)
Probably reacted with some Anti-Mater particles created from "thunderstorm "Sprites". Yes that makes perfect sense but which came first the chicken or the egg (I know this answer).

Yes I have been reading on NASA's JPL site.

Thurmond
 

xuzme720

Dedicated foam bender
Mentor
#57
Ha!,

Hmmm, but maybe the balsa dust and a random blob of hot glue met and eventually caused the Tunguska event!

Sorry, I've been reading "the hitchhikers guide to the galaxy" too much :)
Just find the hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings and have them commission Magrathea to build Earth mark 2 but see if they can leave out the whole gravity thing....
 

Johan

Senior Member
#59
Just find the hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings and have them commission Magrathea to build Earth mark 2 but see if they can leave out the whole gravity thing....
Wait I'll ask the dolphins and Slartibartfast! (funny, Safari's autocorrect either knows of Slartibartfast or just gave up :))
 

Johan

Senior Member
#60
Hi tramsgar, didn't Tesla have an anti gravity theory as well? (Shhh, before you know it, HK will be selling modules doing just that :))