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Mini Scout is Brilliant.

d8veh

Well-known member
#1
I was flying my 4ch Mini scout today. It flies so well. It does everything that a bigger plane will do and more. I'd recommend it to any experienced flyer. It can be slowed right down when it'll still turn tightly without stalling, and when I open the throttle, it's seriously fast.. On high rates, your brain can't keep up with the rate of roll. it's like a shell coming out of a rifled barrel. I also have the Simple Scout, which is OK, but a bit ordinary compared with the Sportster and the Mini Scout. That might be because of the difference in motors and servos.

I used this motor in the Mini Scout. It gives massive thrust with a 6x4 on 3S at 25 amps, so 300w through a 25g motor. It's thrust must be something like double the weight of the complete plane or maybe even more..

https://hobbyking.com/en_us/multist...runner-drone-racing-motor-1808-2600kv-cw.html

I did add a couple of braces to the wings and the elevator to try and hold them straight at the speeds this thing is capable of. I think that this one flies better than the others because it seems to have the right amount of side-thrust and down-thrust, which makes it track very true. For the others, I have to add copious amounts of right rudder every time I open up the throttle.

I haven't flown a 3ch one, but if I made one, I think I'd be looking for a much less powerful motor.

I thank all the guys at Flitetest and wherever for making the plans and instructions available. i don't think you can get a better bang-for-buck plane than this one. It took me all of one evening to make from start to finish, using only one board of foam.

Also, It's extremely robust. It's the only plane I've ever landed inverted without suffering any damage. Don't ask me why I did that. It wasn't a test.

mini scout.jpg mini scout 2.jpg
 

PoorManRC

Well-known member
#5
About to start Building my MM Scout. Will likely be my second Plane in the Air, after my Tiny Trainer. In the Video, she seems just docile enough in 3ch, but wakes up in 4ch.

This, IMHO is another good Trainer, that grows with one's skills!!
 

mrjdstewart

Well-known member
#6
it is a very easy plane to build and fly. i taught 4 kids how to build and fly using this exact model. with that said, if you turn it into a 4-channel and jump to 3S it becomes a very fun flyer and can do just about anything.

laters,

me :cool:
 

d8veh

Well-known member
#8
For a beginner, I would guess that the larger wing area and stall-proof wing of the Mini Sportster would be better. I haven't flown either with 3 channels, so that's just a guess based on my experience of the normal Sportster and my 4ch Mini Scout. I think that the Tiny Trainer would probably be the best first plane, though, the mini planes can take a lot of abuse if you keep them light (light motor, receiver and servos) as long as you manage to go zero throttle a couple of seconds before you hit the ground.
 
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PoorManRC

Well-known member
#11
On our 3rd mini scout I installed the servos before gluing on the bottom piece of the fuselage. I found this to be much easier.
Yeah, I always wondered why the Videos made us Build the whole Fuse FIRST....
There's ample opportunity to install the Servos first - at least before closing it up!!
 

d8veh

Well-known member
#13
Yeah, I always wondered why the Videos made us Build the whole Fuse FIRST....
There's ample opportunity to install the Servos first - at least before closing it up!!
I put all my servos on the outside, which is a lot easier. If you use micro-servos (3.7g) you don't have to worry about the weight. I tried several other ways of installing the servos first, but I didn't like them, and I ended up like the photo in post 1.

Here are my other attempts, which I don't recommend:



mini scout servos.jpg mini scout servos 2.jpg
 

PoorManRC

Well-known member
#15
I put all my servos on the outside, which is a lot easier. If you use micro-servos (3.7g) you don't have to worry about the weight. I tried several other ways of installing the servos first, but I didn't like them, and I ended up like the photo in post 1.

Here are my other attempts, which I don't recommend:

View attachment 119277 View attachment 119278
That first one A La Baby Blender, looks like it SHOULD work... Why didn't it?
 

d8veh

Well-known member
#16
They're all the same plane- my Mini Scout. I didn't like the angle from the servo to ailerons, so I decided to use a direct link using micro servos. While O bought the servos for the ailerons, I bought two more for the rudder and elevator, so i was able to use direct links on those too, rather than wafty thin pushrods running the length of the plane.
 

d8veh

Well-known member
#20
I just bought one of these to measure my motor thrusts more precisely:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/40KG-Dig...e=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649
Attach a cheap wattmeter and you have everything you need to know about your motor and how it performs with different props.

My Mini Scout weighs about 220g using a 650mAh 3S battery and this motor, which was on offer at half that price when I bought it:
https://hobbyking.com/en_us/multist...unner-drone-racing-motor-1808-2600kv-ccw.html

Results: 560g of thrust at 21.2 amps. That's more than double the weight of the plane. No wonder it goes rather well.