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New Graphene Tech.

jtuttle11

Junior Member
#1
I'm getting really tired of my LiPo's Puffing. I'm looking to try the new Graphene technology and would appreciate any input or info any of you would be willing to share about experience with the Graphene battery tech.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#2
The way to stop puffing lipos is to start with ample discharge rating, so don’t run a 20A motor off a 20C small battery, then stop ragging the cells down below 3.6v. I use a timer on planes, I test fly for 3 mins, land, measure the cell voltage, then work out how long I can fly before I have about 3.6-3.7v per cell left, that’s the reserve fuel tank, if I get to the end of the timer I have time to set up a landing and stay above 3.5v per cell, well away from a critical level.
In quads I use the cell voltage on my OSD and land at 3.6v constant.
I then check voltages when I get home and run anything below 3.6v per cell through the storage program on my charger.
I have been flying for 2 years and using Lipo packs for other hobbies for 6 years, never puffed a pack that way.
Graphene batteries and higher quality cells do offer performance gains over cheaper, higher internal resistance cells. There is a large degree of marketing hype involved in some battery claims, especially C rating. However there are quality makes of battery that will be more resistant to high drain damage. None will be resistant to over discharge, that will always puff the pack.
 
#3
Lipos puff if over discharged, or if left fully charged for too long. Switching to grapheme packs isn't as valuable as just learning good lipo maintenance. Theoretically you can be asking too much of them too in terms of current draw, but honestly with modern lipos I think that's unlikely to be an issue.

Only fly them down to 20-30% (3.75-3.8V), don't store or leave them fully charged, don't store them too hot, and make sure you balance charge and/or check the individual cells.

A well looked after pack will last for hundreds of cycles without puffing.
 

jtuttle11

Junior Member
#4
The way to stop puffing lipos is to start with ample discharge rating, so don’t run a 20A motor off a 20C small battery, then stop ragging the cells down below 3.6v. I use a timer on planes, I test fly for 3 mins, land, measure the cell voltage, then work out how long I can fly before I have about 3.6-3.7v per cell left, that’s the reserve fuel tank, if I get to the end of the timer I have time to set up a landing and stay above 3.5v per cell, well away from a critical level.
In quads I use the cell voltage on my OSD and land at 3.6v constant.
I then check voltages when I get home and run anything below 3.6v per cell through the storage program on my charger.
I have been flying for 2 years and using Lipo packs for other hobbies for 6 years, never puffed a pack that way.
Graphene batteries and higher quality cells do offer performance gains over cheaper, higher internal resistance cells. There is a large degree of marketing hype involved in some battery claims, especially C rating. However there are quality makes of battery that will be more resistant to high drain damage. None will be resistant to over discharge, that will always puff the pack.
Thanks for the feedback.
 

evranch

Well-known member
#5
True graphene-based batteries are expected to hit the market as an emerging technology this year. Anything you can buy now is more marketing than reality.

I've never puffed a pack that wasn't the result of it hitting the ground at high velocity and then being salvaged.

There is good advice here and the only thing I'll add is that I cut off my charge at 4.15v instead of 4.20v per cell. There isn't much capacity up at the higher voltage range of a LiPo, and not straining them by pushing them to the max can add many cycles. I believ charging to 4.10 instead of 4.20 can over double your cycle life.

Also check your charging rate. Never charge over 1C (that's 1 amp for every 1000mAh of battery capacity) as this is a quick route to ruining your batteries.
 
#6
Nah, I'd disagree with that. You do extend the life by charging less, and by charging slower, but many modern lipos are rated for very fast charge rates.

I've packs that have lasted 4-5 years which have been charged at 2-3C for their entire life and charged to 4.2V. Even for more demanding helicopter flying they've been fine. At some point you have to balance maximum longevity of the packs with convenience, and everybody is going to have their own preference there.

Charging at between 1-2C is fine for most good packs, but always check what the manufacturer recommends.
 

evranch

Well-known member
#7
That's fair, I guess I should say "Never charge over 1C unless the pack is otherwise labelled" as most good packs will be marked with their acceptable charge rates. There are also cheaper packs out there specifically labelled with a 1C max charge rate.

However, if you pick up some cheapo "100C" pack from Banggood and pour the amps to it, don't be surprised if it gets puffy! 1C is always safe.

I try my absolute best to extend the life of my lipos as they are expensive and hard to acquire in Canada. By far the most expensive part of the airplane.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#8
I stick to 1C or close to that. I can’t afford to keep buying lipo either! I don’t mind waiting a bit for charging.
 

LitterBug

Troll Spammer
#9
If you are always puffing batteries, you might also want to consider switching to better quality packs. Some brands are just puff magnets. I've been mostly flying Tattu and batteries that were manufactured by Tattu but branded to house names. They have been really reliable even when abused.

Cheers!
LitterBug