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Pumpkin drop event

Sneak Peak: Foamboard Focke Wulf 190

kilroy07

Well-known member
#5
I do not have a covering iron but I think I should get one because that looks so good. Is that one done on a flitetest under camber wingtip?
Yup, that's the Tiny Trainer Sport wing... It's always bothered me how there was that ugly notch... this not only solves that, I have been using it on the ailerons to do the bevel and when I did it seems to really stiffen up the control surfaces.

It's something to look for at a swap meet or used on Ebay...
 

Niez13

Well-known member
#6
Yup, that's the Tiny Trainer Sport wing... It's always bothered me how there was that ugly notch... this not only solves that, I have been using it on the ailerons to do the bevel and when I did it seems to really stiffen up the control surfaces.

It's something to look for at a swap meet or used on Ebay...
I could probably try that technique on the Stuka to smooth it out.
 

kilroy07

Well-known member
#7
Do it on a scrap piece first! :oops:

But yea it makes a WORLD of difference, I think you will find it'll take your already great builds to another level!

I usually have my iron set to around 360 F (just under 200 C.)
Take your time, if the foam instantly melts, you've got the iron too hot.

initially I start at a 45 degree angle (like a bevel) just to get the lip formed. As the two sides come together I start "rolling" the edge which produces a super clean leading edge.

I will caution you... it will add some time to your builds, and once you start, you will want to do it to all your builds!
:LOL:
 

MarioGdV

Active member
#8
I have a question, how do you know how much foam do you need to cover the fuselage? Do you just cover it and remove the excess? I'm using Fusion 360 so I can know the exact shape of the piece I need to cut for making a good covering, but I don't know if it's really necessary.
 

Wildthing

Well-known member
#9
I like the structure of the plane, nicely done. It gives me more ideas for my next design using 1mm Depron foam for a skin. When RC Foam closed their doors I picked up two huge rolls of it for $5.00 each.
 

Niez13

Well-known member
#10
Do it on a scrap piece first! :oops:

But yea it makes a WORLD of difference, I think you will find it'll take your already great builds to another level!

I usually have my iron set to around 360 F (just under 200 C.)
Take your time, if the foam instantly melts, you've got the iron too hot.

initially I start at a 45 degree angle (like a bevel) just to get the lip formed. As the two sides come together I start "rolling" the edge which produces a super clean leading edge.

I will caution you... it will add some time to your builds, and once you start, you will want to do it to all your builds!
:LOL:
I will definitely try it out. Thanks for help!
 

Niez13

Well-known member
#11
I have a question, how do you know how much foam do you need to cover the fuselage? Do you just cover it and remove the excess? I'm using Fusion 360 so I can know the exact shape of the piece I need to cut for making a good covering, but I don't know if it's really necessary.
I actually just take paper and make a paper "skin" around the former's. I then take that paper piece and cut it out of foamboard. It takes a little more time but it turns out amazing. I actually wish I had the system you have to be able to do that. I would recommend using your system but if it doesn't turn out good, go with the paper technique.
 

MarioGdV

Active member
#12
I think using paper takes even less time, I'll try to do it to see the differences, but I guess it's almost the same. What I do in the computer is basically cover the space between 2 formers and unfold it to make a 2D piece. Making everything in a 3D program only gives you an idea of how it will look when you build it. It's not really necessary, but since foamboard is a bit expensive here in Spain, I'm trying not to spend too much material. Thank you for the help!
 

Niez13

Well-known member
#13
I think using paper takes even less time, I'll try to do it to see the differences, but I guess it's almost the same. What I do in the computer is basically cover the space between 2 formers and unfold it to make a 2D piece. Making everything in a 3D program only gives you an idea of how it will look when you build it. It's not really necessary, but since foamboard is a bit expensive here in Spain, I'm trying not to spend too much material. Thank you for the help!
No problem but a word of advice with paper molding, is the foamboard piece is actually going to be a little longer than the paper piece. You'll understand once you try it but definitely use white foamboard first before flitetest foamboard.
 

Wildthing

Well-known member
#14
Do it on a scrap piece first! :oops:

But yea it makes a WORLD of difference, I think you will find it'll take your already great builds to another level!

I usually have my iron set to around 360 F (just under 200 C.)
Take your time, if the foam instantly melts, you've got the iron too hot.

initially I start at a 45 degree angle (like a bevel) just to get the lip formed. As the two sides come together I start "rolling" the edge which produces a super clean leading edge.

I will caution you... it will add some time to your builds, and once you start, you will want to do it to all your builds!
:LOL:
It not only looks great but it adds a ton of torsional strength to it and it does weigh less then doing paper.