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Help! Transmitter Set Up

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#1
I've been told that transmitter set up is part of the learning process. I've also learned that my set up is totally screwed. I've got my channels all mixed up. Here is a copy of a post from another thread with rickp answering:

"We were all noobs once, and hopefully continue to learn as we gain experience. :)
With apologies if I've made the following too simplistic and explained things obvious to you.
Read through this, but the bottom line is you don't need to change anything in Phoenix when you switch between three and four channel models.
All Phoenix models (whether three or four channel) roll with the right stick, and channel assignment is taken care of within the Phoenix model.

Based on my DX-6i transmitter, here are the channel assignments typically used with both real and Phoenix models.
For clarity I've ordered them as used on left and right transmitter sticks.

transmitter stick; channel; typical function
left - fore/aft; ch 1; throttle
left - left/right; ch 4; rudder (4 channel model); unused (3 channel model)
right - fore/aft; ch 3; elevator
right - left/right; ch 2; ailerons (4 channel model); rudder (3 channel model)
a switch; ch 5; gear
a switch; ch 6; flaps

Three channel models use throttle, rudder and elevator only; with the rudder rolling the model because of wing dihedral.
Four channel models use throttle, elevator, rudder and ailerons; with roll controlled with the ailerons and yaw controlled with the rudder.
And since you traditionally roll a model with the right stick, the rudder is switched to ch 2 in a three channel model.
But you don't need to change channel assignments in Phoenix, that's taken care of within each model.
Stated another way - all Phoenix models, whether three or four channel, roll with the right stick.

Hope that clear things up, rick "

I've got the Turnigy 9x and I know where the menu is to change modes. I've got four of them. Problem is, I don't have any mode that puts the throttle on channel 1. That might also explain why I can't get Phoenix to recognize my switches. I'm missing something. Help.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#2
The normal standard channel allocations are;
Ch 1 - Turn! Rudder on a 3 channel model and Aileron on a 4 channel setup.
Ch 2 - Pitch Elevator
Ch 3 - Engine control ESC or throttle servo
Ch 4 - Yaw/Turn 2 Normally ignored on a 3 channel installation and used for rudder on a 4 channel installation.

basic 3 channel normally rudder, elevator and throttle (In that order).
Basic 4 channel normally Aileron, elevator, throttle, and Rudder (In that order).

On a mode one transmitter the throttle in on the right gimbal and in mode two the throttle is on the left gimbal.

Have fun!
 
Last edited:

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#3
The normal standard channel allocations are;
Ch 1 - Turn! Rudder on a 3 channel model and Aileron on a 4 channel setup.
Ch 2 - Pitch Elevator
Ch 3 - Engine control ESC or throttle servo
Ch 4 - Yaw/Turn 2 Normally ignored on a 3 channel installation and used for rudder on a 4 channel installation.

basic 3 channel normally rudder, elevator and throttle (In that order).
Basic 4 channel normally Aileron, elevator, throttle, and Rudder (In that order).

On a mode one transmitter the throttle in on the left gimbal and in mode two the throttle is on the right gimbal.

Have fun!
That completely contradicts the post I copied above. What gives? I am now really, really confused.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#4
Unfortunately some manufacturers think that their "Special" channel order will make you buy their gear only once you buy their kit.

The original channel designations came from the order in which the channels were added to the RC systems.

The first thing needed was to be able to turn, (prior to that the only planes were effectively FF and often disappeared over the horizon.
The second channel added was elevator to provide a proper and viable control system.
The next channel added was throttle when carburetted engines were first made available so a more realistic flight envelope could be realised.
Finally a secondary turn channel was added for when Ailerons were added. As most 3 channel pilots used ch! for their primary turn it became standard to use the same primary turn channel, (1), for ailerons and the rudder moved or relegated to channel 4 for use in ground maneuvers and yaw correction in flight.

Every Transmitter I have ever owned has had the standard channel or Rx slot assignments. The VERY small number of systems with different allocations are the ones I avoid completely.

If unsure do your own Internet search. The information in my previous post is the way all of my transmitters from various different manufactures are setup or built.

Have fun!
 

d8veh

Well-known member
#5
You need to select mode 2 to get the channels on the sticks that you've stated. That's probably the most popular mode for RC planes. It gives:
Throttle on left stick up and down.
Rudder on left stick side to side (not used 3ch)
Elevator on right stick up and down
Ailerons on right stick side to side (rudder 3ch)

Aftter that, all you have to do is plug your servos into the right slots in your receiver.

On some transmitters, you can change which functions are on which channels, but you should only change that if you know why you're changing it. The normal assignment from ch1 to ch4 is Ailerons, elevator, engine, rudder.

You need to figure out how your dual-rates work, so look in the manual.
 

Andrew

G'day Mate
#6
I've been told that transmitter set up is part of the learning process. I've also learned that my set up is totally screwed. I've got my channels all mixed up. Here is a copy of a post from another thread with rickp answering:

"We were all noobs once, and hopefully continue to learn as we gain experience. :)
With apologies if I've made the following too simplistic and explained things obvious to you.
Read through this, but the bottom line is you don't need to change anything in Phoenix when you switch between three and four channel models.
All Phoenix models (whether three or four channel) roll with the right stick, and channel assignment is taken care of within the Phoenix model.

Based on my DX-6i transmitter, here are the channel assignments typically used with both real and Phoenix models.
For clarity I've ordered them as used on left and right transmitter sticks.

transmitter stick; channel; typical function
left - fore/aft; ch 1; throttle
left - left/right; ch 4; rudder (4 channel model); unused (3 channel model)
right - fore/aft; ch 3; elevator
right - left/right; ch 2; ailerons (4 channel model); rudder (3 channel model)
a switch; ch 5; gear
a switch; ch 6; flaps

Three channel models use throttle, rudder and elevator only; with the rudder rolling the model because of wing dihedral.
Four channel models use throttle, elevator, rudder and ailerons; with roll controlled with the ailerons and yaw controlled with the rudder.
And since you traditionally roll a model with the right stick, the rudder is switched to ch 2 in a three channel model.
But you don't need to change channel assignments in Phoenix, that's taken care of within each model.
Stated another way - all Phoenix models, whether three or four channel, roll with the right stick.

Hope that clear things up, rick "

I've got the Turnigy 9x and I know where the menu is to change modes. I've got four of them. Problem is, I don't have any mode that puts the throttle on channel 1. That might also explain why I can't get Phoenix to recognize my switches. I'm missing something. Help.
If your using Turnigy 9X the throttle should be on channel 3.

Taranis/Futaba/Turnigy9X use AETR map layout

JR/SPEKTRUM use TAER map layout

Somewhere in Phoenix there should be a setting to select the right channel map to suit your transmitter.
 

Andrew

G'day Mate
#7
The normal standard channel allocations are;
Ch 1 - Turn! Rudder on a 3 channel model and Aileron on a 4 channel setup.
Ch 2 - Pitch Elevator
Ch 3 - Engine control ESC or throttle servo
Ch 4 - Yaw/Turn 2 Normally ignored on a 3 channel installation and used for rudder on a 4 channel installation.

basic 3 channel normally rudder, elevator and throttle (In that order).
Basic 4 channel normally Aileron, elevator, throttle, and Rudder (In that order).

On a mode one transmitter the throttle in on the left gimbal and in mode two the throttle is on the right gimbal.

Have fun!
In the last paragraph you have the mode wrong way around,
It should be,
Mode 1 throttle on right stick
Mode 2 throttle on left stick
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#9
It is a Turnigy 9x that I am trying to set up.

It needs to be in Mode 2. I've had throttle on the left stick for too long in the sim and with my toy quads to want to change it. Here is a pic of my transmitter channel/stick layout in Mode 2.

IMG_0163.JPG


If my understanding of what ya'll have shared is correct, then for this transmitter, a 3 channel setup means that -
Channel 1 is not allocated.
Channel 2 is Elevators. Right stick, up and down.
Channel 3 is throttle, left stick up and down.
Channel 4 is rudder. Left stick, side to side.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#10
It is a Turnigy 9x that I am trying to set up.

It needs to be in Mode 2. I've had throttle on the left stick for too long in the sim and with my toy quads to want to change it. Here is a pic of my transmitter channel/stick layout in Mode 2.

View attachment 120493

If my understanding of what ya'll have shared is correct, then for this transmitter, a 3 channel setup means that -
Channel 1 is not allocated.
Channel 2 is Elevators. Right stick, up and down.
Channel 3 is throttle, left stick up and down.
Channel 4 is rudder. Left stick, side to side.
For a better learning experience Ch1 should be primary turn channel. Rudder for standard 3 channel and aileron on 4 channel.
Channel 4 would become rudder on a 4 channel installation.

The reason for this is that you will develop a reflex turn over time, (helps in emergency), so using the channel allocation as I have just described will allow a reflex turn to be learned.

I started out on standard 3 channel and when I tried to transition to 4 channel I tried keeping the rudder as the primary turn and I was able to fly but in a very clumsy and uncoordinated manner. I was advised to use the primary turn channel for the aileron and relegate the rudder to the secondary and suddenly it all clicked.

Now I fly almost any number of channels required with or without rudder OR ailerons, Even with birds than use elevons and drag rudders without needing to remember whether the plane has a rudder or ailerons fitted and then fly accordingly!.

Just trying to make it easy for you!

have fun!
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#11
For a better learning experience Ch1 should be primary turn channel. Rudder for standard 3 channel and aileron on 4 channel.
Channel 4 would become rudder on a 4 channel installation.

The reason for this is that you will develop a reflex turn over time, (helps in emergency), so using the channel allocation as I have just described will allow a reflex turn to be learned.

I started out on standard 3 channel and when I tried to transition to 4 channel I tried keeping the rudder as the primary turn and I was able to fly but in a very clumsy and uncoordinated manner. I was advised to use the primary turn channel for the aileron and relegate the rudder to the secondary and suddenly it all clicked.

Now I fly almost any number of channels required with or without rudder OR ailerons, Even with birds than use elevons and drag rudders without needing to remember whether the plane has a rudder or ailerons fitted and then fly accordingly!.

Just trying to make it easy for you!

have fun!
I'm sort of getting it. What you're trying to say is that with the setup I described, as I transition from three to four channel, my rudder stick will change.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#13
What I am saying is to forget the use of the term of rudder channel or aileron channel. Better to think of Ch1 as the TURN channel.

A little extra thought may be required on take off for a 4 channel bird BUT all flying reflexes will be automatic. Remember when something happens when flying everything happens a whole lot faster and a well trained reflex can save a lot of workshop time!

Oh and the above channel allocations will correspond with retail products, (when you get around to purchasing them or they otherwise come into your possession!

Have fun!
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#14
Seriously, I'm really tempted to just skip the bank and yank and go for four channel. That's where I'm going anyway, and I've got a sim. Plus, I bought the A pack. I've got the servo.
 

d8veh

Well-known member
#16
Your transmitter is set correctly for mode 2. When you have a three channel plane, plug the rufdder servo into ch1 in the receiver, and when you have a 4ch, you plug it into ch 4. Some receievers are marked ch1, ch2...., etc. Some are marked ail, elev, thr, rud, aux1, etc. If you have the latter, you can see the channel sequence from the positions of the connections, so ail = ch1, elev = ch2, etc.
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#17
Your transmitter is set correctly for mode 2. When you have a three channel plane, plug the rufdder servo into ch1 in the receiver, and when you have a 4ch, you plug it into ch 4. Some receievers are marked ch1, ch2...., etc. Some are marked ail, elev, thr, rud, aux1, etc. If you have the latter, you can see the channel sequence from the positions of the connections, so ail = ch1, elev = ch2, etc.
I am thinking four channel from the get go. Hai-Lee, I know you'll disagree, but you teach students. Your students have the benefit of a teacher, who is there with them. I don't have that.

I don't want to have to relearn where the rudder is supposed to be. I have enough issues just with orientation to keep my mind and fingers busy. I'm going to learn 4 channel, unless the sim model is three in which case, heck I don't know. I broke the USB 22 in 1 last night and I'm trying to repair it.

I'm going to get the sim dongle repaired, and fly a whole lot of four channel planes. With my trans set up for four channel, since I know how to do that now. It may not be the standard way of doing things, but that's pretty much my M.O.

Thank you, everyone for your help. That's why I'm here. Give and receive. Thank you. I'll keep you posted and will hopefully not have another frustrated post in the next few days at least.

The Journey Continues.
 

d8veh

Well-known member
#18
Learning on a 3ch is a bit easier than 4ch, though it's not really a big deal. It's no problem to switch from 3ch to 4ch. You don't have to re-learn anything. It's more like a progression than a change. For a 3ch plane, the steering is more like a car. Turn the wheel to turn and let go of it to go straight. 4ch is the same except the plane doesn't go straight when you let go. You have to steer it back to straight before you can let go.
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#19
Learning on a 3ch is a bit easier than 4ch, though it's not really a big deal. It's no problem to switch from 3ch to 4ch. You don't have to re-learn anything. It's more like a progression than a change. For a 3ch plane, the steering is more like a car. Turn the wheel to turn and let go of it to go straight. 4ch is the same except the plane doesn't go straight when you let go. You have to steer it back to straight before you can let go.
Motorcycle on a curve. Lean into it, bring it back out. I keep using motorcycle analoges, but they seem to work for me.

From what we've covered thus far, though, the rudder changes sticks, from three to four channel.
 

d8veh

Well-known member
#20
Motorcycle on a curve. Lean into it, bring it back out. I keep using motorcycle analoges, but they seem to work for me.

From what we've covered thus far, though, the rudder changes sticks, from three to four channel.
Motorcycles are a lot more complicated. They're easy to ride, but most people don't understand how they steer. You hear of people saying it's done by leaning and/or weight transfer. It's possible to make slight turns like that, but I can guarantee that you wouldn't win any races. What you actually do is turn the handlebars the opposite way to what you want to turn to initiate the turn, then pull them into the turn to straighten back up. It's all done with gyroscopes, which are completely counter-intuitive, and Flemmings right hand rule. Then, just when you think you've understood that, it all reverses when your speed goes below 10 mph, so you have to turn left to go left. That's because the gyroscopic effect becomes less significant at low speed. Can you imagine turning your rudder different ways depending on what speed you were flying? That would be some challenge, though somehow we master it with motorcycles!

In case I've confused you, here's a video that explains the basics: