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How to fly/build an scratch build plane

FastCrash45

Well-known member
#2
So for this project in school i am building a plane. I am pretty good at building, but not flying. Could you people give me some tips.
You want a larger wing area for slower flights. Usually a top wing is best for beginner flyers. Depending on the size you'll probably want to have down and right thrust angles for counterclockwise spinning props. The larger the prop and motor the more angle you'll need. If it's a pusher configuration you'll need different angles than tractor configurations. With more wing area you'll be able to fly slower but if built right you can build a shorter wing for more speed. If it's a 3 channel then you'll want dihedral built into the wing.
 

Vimana89

Well-known member
#4
I believe we answered some of this already but I'll summarize. You need to scale up a bit in size from your last builds, especially the size of the horizontal portion of your tail area. Go three channels, rudder, elevator, throttle. Add a modest wing dihedral. Make sure you have a slight down and right thrust angle.Either one of the two planes you posted would work if altered like this, the first one or the more basic trainer looking one. Make sure everything is straight,some slight imperfections here or there won't kill it but it should look at least clean by eye, like nothing obviously crooked or lopsided.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
Mentor
#5
So for this project in school i am building a plane. I am pretty good at building, but not flying. Could you people give me some tips.
Build a few proven designs and learn to fly! Once you can fly properly then you can design and build your own design. The building of a few proven designs will give you some experience n what really works well and the key aspects of their design.

A poor pilot makes a good design fly poorly whereas a good pilot can make a poor design appear to fly quite well!

Have fun!
 

Vimana89

Well-known member
#6
Build a few proven designs and learn to fly! Once you can fly properly then you can design and build your own design. The building of a few proven designs will give you some experience n what really works well and the key aspects of their design.

A poor pilot makes a good design fly poorly whereas a good pilot can make a poor design appear to fly quite well!

Have fun!
This is good advice, and I would second it. I don't know what kind of deadline you are on with this project, but I started this hobby around late last year as a newb trying first with my own designs, which to my major difficulty,were and are a good bit more ambitious that the ones you have tried. With a kit, plan, or retail plane, all the thinking about design is pretty much done for you so you can just get a feel for piloting and perhaps learn some build techniques to apply to your own designs. I didn't have success with my own designs until after multiple prototypes, and that was only after building one kit and learning to fly a basic trainer. Look for a free simulator called Multiflight. That was the tool that helped me most.
 
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Vimana89

Well-known member
#7
Also, home designs and scratch builds are pretty much bound to have some handling quirks and imperfections, at least before you get them dialed in. Training your skill as a pilot with a simulator and a basic trainer of some type will help you work around handling issues that could otherwise kill a maiden flight.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#8
There were lots of very detailed answers to your question in your other thread where you asked for help with the plane you were building.
I saw all the basic rules of thumb in this detailed reply that you would need to design a plane.
Build light, it’s easy to add more weight or power to something but very hard to lose any.
The flying is a matter of setting it up carefully on the bench, testing then the rest is muscle memory.