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Pumpkin drop event

Two Plane Build Projects

#21
MAJOR UPDATE: I finally figured out how to throw this huge thing into the air, it glides pretty darn good, from the door way of the living room to the couch; flew the whole way, it hit the back cushion with the nose. But for sure this thing is only a test subject, will need to make it proper and stiffer. @sprzout @Chuppster
 
#22
@sprzout what would happen if I make the B-52 longer and do that two wing design as I have on the test project and how does one do the dual engine mounts as shown below? see the wing tips, I would also like to add an extra set of landing gears to help wings when it lands and takes off; kind of like the training wheels we had as a kid on our bikes.
 

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Chuppster

Well-known member
#23
@sprzout what would happen if I make the B-52 longer and do that two wing design as I have on the test project and how does one do the dual engine mounts as shown below? see the wing tips, I would also like to add an extra set of landing gears to help wings when it lands and takes off; kind of like the training wheels we had as a kid on our bikes.
Are you looking to design a tandem-wing B-52?
 

Chuppster

Well-known member
#26
You could always try it! I would recommend trimming the wings, though, because the main wings of the B-52 should supply plenty of lift on an RC model, and if there are two full-sized B-52 wings you will suffer from a lot of drag. The reason you don't see a lot of tandem wings is that they are inefficient compared to just using one big wing, and it's a lot more difficult to balance the airframe (find the CG).

If your airplane is rolling on a glide test, you will want to trim it by lightly bending the ailerons to counter the roll effect. If it's leaning right, then turn the right-hand aileron down a bit and the left-hand aileron up. Adjust the amount until it glides straight.
 

Chuppster

Well-known member
#28
will do. Thanks @Chuppster oh what product is best to build the electric version of a B-52? foam board still?
That's a big question. I'll try and answer it briefly.

Foam Board would be the cheapest for sure. It doesn't require much special equipment and it's durable and lightweight. Here's an example of the B-52's predecessor, the B-36, done in Foamboard. It has a 6" wingspan and is a very advanced build, but you could use the plans for inspiration.

https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/6-wingspan-b-36-w-edfs-andbombs.53961/

Hotwire foam would be another option. This is where you take foam insulation and cut it with a hot wire. Here you need more expensive materials but you can get very detailed models that look incredible. Here's a build thread of someone who did a foam B-52 with a 7' wingspan.

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?2880197-B-52-7-ft-SPAN-Foam-construction

Balsa is also an option, but that is the most expensive and time consuming way to build it. I don't have any examples for you, but I will suggest you don't begin your scratch building journey here.

So, in summary, foamboard may not be the best option for building a B-52, but I believe it is the simplest option and can yield some very good results.
 
#29
That's a big question. I'll try and answer it briefly.

Foam Board would be the cheapest for sure. It doesn't require much special equipment and it's durable and lightweight. Here's an example of the B-52's predecessor, the B-36, done in Foamboard. It has a 6" wingspan and is a very advanced build, but you could use the plans for inspiration.

https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/6-wingspan-b-36-w-edfs-andbombs.53961/

Hotwire foam would be another option. This is where you take foam insulation and cut it with a hot wire. Here you need more expensive materials but you can get very detailed models that look incredible. Here's a build thread of someone who did a foam B-52 with a 7' wingspan.

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?2880197-B-52-7-ft-SPAN-Foam-construction

Balsa is also an option, but that is the most expensive and time consuming way to build it. I don't have any examples for you, but I will suggest you don't begin your scratch building journey here.

So, in summary, foamboard may not be the best option for building a B-52, but I believe it is the simplest option and can yield some very good results.
Wow, I can say this again, wow on both designs, will be doing some studying and keep testing that two winger I got, both are awesome designs, I've seen the hot foam, just didn't know what it was made from it and how, I knew they shaved it to mold it into shape. As a kid, I sat in the captain's chair of the B-29 at a airshow, just been fascinated by these bombers, then when I made that two wing thing, thought, oh yeah, two wing B-52. Well this is alot to study and will do the foam board be easiest and cheapiest, but will do a lot of studying the B-36.
 
#31
Doing a Foam Board Tandem Wing Two Wing B-52 first wing will be the normal B-52 long wing, second behind it will be shorter, and a budget, looking at the EDF Motors on the Hobby King site

which engines to pair together like the B-52 engines, should I do the normal two holders for the four engines each or do three holders and would six engines on each wing be too much, or what would you all think, seeking your advice, still studying how to do this two wing project for this big build. @Horseman3381 @sprzout @Chuppster
 

Chuppster

Well-known member
#32
Doing a Foam Board Tandem Wing Two Wing B-52 first wing will be the normal B-52 long wing, second behind it will be shorter, and a budget, looking at the EDF Motors on the Hobby King site

which engines to pair together like the B-52 engines, should I do the normal two holders for the four engines each or do three holders and would six engines on each wing be too much, or what would you all think, seeking your advice, still studying how to do this two wing project for this big build. @Horseman3381 @sprzout @Chuppster
If you are doing tandem wing, are you only going to put the EDF's on the front wing, or will it have 8 engine pods, 4 on each wing?

You could do one EDF per pod or two, it's up to you. Keep scale in mind, though. Once you determine your wingspan look at your 3-view drawing and find the size of the motor pods. You can do this by using the following formula:

(Airplane Wingspan/Drawing Wingspan) = (EDF size/drawing engine size)

or

EDF Size = (drawing engine size * airplane wingspan)/drawing wingspan

You can get EDFs that are too large but they will look a little funny if you are going for a scale look. Common sizes are 30mm, 50mm, 64mm, and 70mm.

Hobbyking EDF's are not very good value. Banggood has decent ones that are affordable. Just remember, for each EDF you will also need an ESC.
 
#33
If you are doing tandem wing, are you only going to put the EDF's on the front wing, or will it have 8 engine pods, 4 on each wing?

You could do one EDF per pod or two, it's up to you. Keep scale in mind, though. Once you determine your wingspan look at your 3-view drawing and find the size of the motor pods. You can do this by using the following formula:

(Airplane Wingspan/Drawing Wingspan) = (EDF size/drawing engine size)

or

EDF Size = (drawing engine size * airplane wingspan)/drawing wingspan

You can get EDFs that are too large but they will look a little funny if you are going for a scale look. Common sizes are 30mm, 50mm, 64mm, and 70mm.

Hobbyking EDF's are not very good value. Banggood has decent ones that are affordable. Just remember, for each EDF you will also need an ESC.
I was looking at the EDFs to see if I can keep the tandem B-52 engine look where it has no props, I began to draw out the front wing to see how to place either the usual 3 pod as the normal B-52 tandem has, but since it will be longer, thought of doing four holders; that hold the engine pods, which would be eight engine pods per wing, trying to do this build a tad larger than Horseman's B-36. But that would mean 16 ESC, yikes.

trying to see what to do with the secondary wing, which I want to position just a tad higher than the big tandem wing, should I spread the engines to both first and secondary wing?
 
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Chuppster

Well-known member
#34
I was looking at the EDFs to see if I can keep the tandem B-52 engine look where it has no props, I began to draw out the front wing to see how to place either the usual 3 pod as the normal B-52 tandem has, but since it will be longer, thought of doing four holders; that hold the engine pods, which would be eight engine pods per wing, trying to do this build a tad larger than Horseman's B-36. But that would mean 16 ESC, yikes.

trying to see what to do with the secondary wing, which I want to position just a tad higher than the big tandem wing, should I spread the engines to both first and secondary wing?
I don't know if that would be helpful or not. I don't have any experience with tandem wings.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#35
If you are doing tandem wing, are you only going to put the EDF's on the front wing, or will it have 8 engine pods, 4 on each wing?

You could do one EDF per pod or two, it's up to you. Keep scale in mind, though. Once you determine your wingspan look at your 3-view drawing and find the size of the motor pods. You can do this by using the following formula:

(Airplane Wingspan/Drawing Wingspan) = (EDF size/drawing engine size)

or

EDF Size = (drawing engine size * airplane wingspan)/drawing wingspan

You can get EDFs that are too large but they will look a little funny if you are going for a scale look. Common sizes are 30mm, 50mm, 64mm, and 70mm.

Hobbyking EDF's are not very good value. Banggood has decent ones that are affordable. Just remember, for each EDF you will also need an ESC.
Also, keep in mind the weight. If you're talking about strapping 3 EDF motors to each wing, you're going to have to have some massive bracing throughout the wing. You can't put little wheels on the ends of the wings; that will only help while it's on the ground. Once you put it in the air, gravity (one of the four forces of flight) takes over, and it'll pull that wing straight down.

In addition, if you're going to be pushing 6 motors, you're looking at several packs of batteries. EDFs want LOTS of juice; most large scale EDFs want 6S batteries, and with 3 motors per wing, you're looking at multiple 6S batteries. That's a LOT of weight to get up into the air, which means that you've got to have large, correctly shaped wings to get lift (the force of flight that counteracts weight/gravity) and supports that will hold up to the weight and thrust of the engines.
 
#36
Also, keep in mind the weight. If you're talking about strapping 3 EDF motors to each wing, you're going to have to have some massive bracing throughout the wing. You can't put little wheels on the ends of the wings; that will only help while it's on the ground. Once you put it in the air, gravity (one of the four forces of flight) takes over, and it'll pull that wing straight down.

In addition, if you're going to be pushing 6 motors, you're looking at several packs of batteries. EDFs want LOTS of juice; most large scale EDFs want 6S batteries, and with 3 motors per wing, you're looking at multiple 6S batteries. That's a LOT of weight to get up into the air, which means that you've got to have large, correctly shaped wings to get lift (the force of flight that counteracts weight/gravity) and supports that will hold up to the weight and thrust of the engines.
Thanks @sprzout been off the computer due to a lot of severe storms coming through today, just the thunder, but mom taught me to try to stay off when it thunders to protect the electronics, what you say is true, glad to have both of you here to ask questions and to learn, how are the brush and brushless motors for such weird wings? just trying to figure out when I build it for real, how to do the CG with all the needed electronics, the reason I asked about the wheels on the edge of the wings is to stable it when taking it off and landing, saw a Youtube video of a RC B-52 and it had it, but it didn't end too well. So I've been watching videos of the RC bombers as well. For sure to use @Horseman3381 B-36 plans, just thinking on how to keep it looking like the real thing, even though the main tandem will be original and the other will be a tad above it. Where can one find carbon fiber rods, I know for sure our walmart in Western Kansas has the BBQ skewers, would that work for wing bracing? @Chuppster if you know guys who build a tandem B-52, invite them here to this discussion and study, it be great to have their words of wisdom too. Thanks.
 

cranialrectosis

Faster than a speeding faceplant!
Mentor
#37
Go brushless for anything larger than your hand.

Hobby shops have carbon rods but they tend to be pricey. Some guys use fishing rods and you can get square or round hardwood dowel from most hardware stores. Carbon fiber is best because it is so rigid and so light. Fishing rods are light but not nearly as rigid as carbon and hardwood is heavy compared to carbon.
 
#38
Go brushless for anything larger than your hand.

Hobby shops have carbon rods but they tend to be pricey. Some guys use fishing rods and you can get square or round hardwood dowel from most hardware stores. Carbon fiber is best because it is so rigid and so light. Fishing rods are light but not nearly as rigid as carbon and hardwood is heavy compared to carbon.
Thank you.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#39
Something else that might be usable is paint sticks. Go down to your local Lowe's/Home Depot/Orchard Supply Hardware/True Value/ACE Hardware, go to the paint counter, and ask them for some paint sticks. Most will give you some for free, printed with the name of the hardware store on the paint stick.

Next, look at the way the MiG-3 uses the paint sticks for wing stability and strength in a wing spar; you might be able to use a somewhat similar setup for your wing.

And the wheels...Seriously, think about it - you're building something to scale. If the airplane engineers who are building full sized C-130s and B-52s and Super Guppies, etc., and not having to put wheels on the ends of their wings for landing and takeoff? It's because they engineered the wing properly, with material strength to not require the wheels because it's strong enough not to flex heavily and snap on takeoff or landing.
 
#40
Something else that might be usable is paint sticks. Go down to your local Lowe's/Home Depot/Orchard Supply Hardware/True Value/ACE Hardware, go to the paint counter, and ask them for some paint sticks. Most will give you some for free, printed with the name of the hardware store on the paint stick.

Next, look at the way the MiG-3 uses the paint sticks for wing stability and strength in a wing spar; you might be able to use a somewhat similar setup for your wing.

And the wheels...Seriously, think about it - you're building something to scale. If the airplane engineers who are building full sized C-130s and B-52s and Super Guppies, etc., and not having to put wheels on the ends of their wings for landing and takeoff? It's because they engineered the wing properly, with material strength to not require the wheels because it's strong enough not to flex heavily and snap on takeoff or landing.
Thanks, good point on the guys who put the training wheels on it. will look at the mig.