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Ace GLH 250 - My first balsa build!

Grifflyer

WWII fanatic
#1
Hi all,
I will be attempting my first balsa build, by building the @Willy Nillies Ace GLH 250!! I chose this plane because I'm currently lacking a fast prop plane in my lineup, and there was a build guide for the plane on Willy Nillies youtube channel.

I was having lots of fun so I didn't take a whole lot of pictures, but here is the fuselage almost complete.
P1280378.JPG


P1280380.JPG


So far everything has fit together really well, and I've had no problems so far, although I would like the tolerances on the slots for the tabs to be a bit tighter but that's just me:D

I'll probably be asking lots of questions so be prepared for that:p Like what is a covering film hinge? The instructions recommend using a "covering film hinge" for the elevator.
 
Last edited:

vhandon

Active member
#2
I created a build log for the GLH-250. Maybe it can help.

https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/willy-nillies-glh-250-assembly-guide.60522/

A covering film hinge is simply a piece of covering ironed on the bottom and top of the control surface. If you have built an Armin wing then the procedure is similar. An overlap of about 1/2 inch on each surface should be enough for this plane. I start by applying the hinge on the non beveled side (usually the top) then actuate the hinge up and apply the other side. This allows for free travel.
 

Grifflyer

WWII fanatic
#3
I created a build log for the GLH-250. Maybe it can help.

https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/willy-nillies-glh-250-assembly-guide.60522/

A covering film hinge is simply a piece of covering ironed on the bottom and top of the control surface. If you have built an Armin wing then the procedure is similar. An overlap of about 1/2 inch on each surface should be enough for this plane. I start by applying the hinge on the non beveled side (usually the top) then actuate the hinge up and apply the other side. This allows for free travel.
Thanks!
 

Grifflyer

WWII fanatic
#8
Alright so I covered the V stab. It came out really good, and I was surprised to still be able to see the wood grain whenever I held the part up to a light. I did have one problem though, It appears that the colored part and what I'm guessing is the adhesive sheet separated. It happened on all of the edges of covering, but this was the biggest (all the others can barely be seen)
P1280397.JPG


Does anybody now why this happened and how I stop it from happening? I'm just going to put a small piece of covering material over the white part to hide it...
 

Willy Nillies

Well-known member
#9
What kind of covering is it?

99.999 % of the time there is a plastic protective sheet that MUST be pulled off the colored part before you apply to structure.... I'm guessing this is your problem.

Sincerely,
Doug and Becky
WillyNillies.com
 

Turbojoe

Well-known member
#13
Doug is right. Iron is way too hot. I do the same thing all the time. I know better but just never seem to learn. Depending on the covering sometimes good old isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol alcohol on a paper towel will clean off the color/adhesive smear. Other times I have to use acetone (nail polish remover works too). Also try using a "sock" on the iron.

Joe
 

rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
#14
Doug is right. Iron is way too hot. I do the same thing all the time. I know better but just never seem to learn. Depending on the covering sometimes good old isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol alcohol on a paper towel will clean off the color/adhesive smear. Other times I have to use acetone (nail polish remover works too). Also try using a "sock" on the iron.

Joe
I've heard that thin toddler socks work just as well as special made covering iron socks too - haven't tried it yet, but plan to with my next covering job since my old sock is pretty well colored in!
 

Turbojoe

Well-known member
#15
I've heard that thin toddler socks work just as well as special made covering iron socks too - haven't tried it yet, but plan to with my next covering job since my old sock is pretty well colored in!
Yep, I've got a nice stash of my grandsons baby socks. I pull them tight to the iron shoe and use a zip tie to hold them nice and tight and smooth. If they're not tight they can lay over and create nasty wrinkles. If you don't have a baby or grand baby to steal from Goodwill would probably be a great place to score a mess of them cheap.

Joe
 
#16
I'm using a big clothes iron so I don't think a sock would fit, I'm just going to keep messing around with the temperature until it works. How long should you need to apply heat before it starts shrinking?
 

rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
#18
I'm using a big clothes iron so I don't think a sock would fit, I'm just going to keep messing around with the temperature until it works. How long should you need to apply heat before it starts shrinking?
Try making up a little frame of balsa or scrap wood and experiment with covering pieces on it - or cut little strips of covering and drop them (adhesive side up) on the iron to see how they react. Personally, when in shrinking mode (after everything is stuck down to the frame) I like to have the iron hot enough that the covering starts shrinking after 2 or 3 seconds of being on the iron. If it starts shrinking immediately it's too hot for me.
 

Piotrsko

Well-known member
#19
I'm a hair dryer fancier for shrinking since heat guns get way too hot. Unlike @rockyboy, I only use the iron on the millions of wrinkes I get after shrinking. I used to use a gas stove, but THAT worked out well(NOT)
 

TooJung2Die

Well-known member
#20
I've switched to a adjustable heat gun for shrinking. The iron is mostly used for tacking down and sealing edges. The iron has to be in contact with the film for best heat transfer. That can be hard to do with a large clothing iron but I've covered airplanes with one too.