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Attach Wings to Cylindrical Fuselage

#1
Hey Guys,

Im a long time reader, first time poster. If this should be posted somewhere else please let me know.

On to my question:
I am trying to create a semi realistic F104 Starfighter build (based on the design with small changes for ease of construction). I am having trouble finding how I can attach my weird trapezoidal winds to the fuselage without them being completely wonky and irregular. I thought about just poking a rod through the fuselage to attach them, but since this build uses an edf (my first edf build), I am trying to limit the obstacles at the front and the back of the edf motor so I don't break up the airflow. Do you guys have any tips or thoughts on how to put the wings on in a way that will get them on at the right angles and fuselage height.
 

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Timmy

Legendary member
#2
Try making a wing box like on real airliners. you could have a section of the fuse that is more flat where the wings meet but round everywhere else so it blends in with the rest of the fuse. That could strengthen the area and make gluing easier but gluing alone is probably too weak. Thats my input. Not sure how helpful it is but oh well. Maybe it could give you some inspiration or something.
 
#3
Try making a wing box like on real airliners. you could have a section of the fuse that is more flat where the wings meet but round everywhere else so it blends in with the rest of the fuse. That could strengthen the area and make gluing easier but gluing alone is probably too weak. Thats my input. Not sure how helpful it is but oh well. Maybe it could give you some inspiration or something.
Thanks,

You gave me a few ideas to look into.
 

leaded50

Legendary member
#4
use a couple of hardwood insides combined formers,/ wingspar(plywood-glasfiber) as i make to use on this picture of a wingspar on edf plane.
Also use of wingfillets all around will strenghten the wing/stabilizer much against a rounded fuselage.
 

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Timmy

Legendary member
#5
use a couple of hardwood insides combined formers,/ wingspar(plywood-glasfiber) as i make to use on this picture of a wingspar on edf plane.
Also use of wingfillets all around will strenghten the wing/stabilizer much against a rounded fuselage.
That is a good idea!
 

leaded50

Legendary member
#6
just remember the F104 Starfighter had a big wingload, and will get hard use as a rc model too, if fully realistic measures. I would advice make the wings taller for easyer flying, less "twitchy" flight.
 
#7
use a couple of hardwood insides combined formers,/ wingspar(plywood-glasfiber) as i make to use on this picture of a wingspar on edf plane.
Also use of wingfillets all around will strenghten the wing/stabilizer much against a rounded fuselage.
Thank you for the advice and illustrations. I will see what I can do with what you have mentioned.
 
#8
just remember the F104 Starfighter had a big wingload, and will get hard use as a rc model too, if fully realistic measures. I would advice make the wings taller for easyer flying, less "twitchy" flight.
Yeah, that was another problem I thought I would have, such small wings at a weird angle, should make it very maneuverable, but like you say, that also means twitchy. I did make the wings bigger and plan on attaching them at a more neutral angle for a more stable flight. It is the aesthetic I am more interested in then the "historical" accuracy of the build itself. Thanks for your input.