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Crash support group

Hoomi

Well-known member
Pretty girl! We've had Aussies pretty much our entire married life, and it just doesn't seem like home without at least one. Shiloh was our Red, and worked several years as both my wife's service dog before her hip replacement, and her show dog (obedience and rally). We had to say good-bye to him a few months ago. Old age and arthritis finally got the better of him. Stormy is my brat, though old age has put a lot of gray in her muzzle, and taken away a lot of her energy. She's still with us, though, and hopefully will be for a while longer. These photos of both were taken during their prime years.
 

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New guy here, and well, it seems I’m not alone.
Built up a tiny trainer. Really enjoyed the build. My first plane build, other than assembling an old Cox Cessna Skylane (and promptly crashing) 30 years ago as a teen.
I Launched the TT, wind was wrong, other factors at play, blah blah blah, it nose dived.
Attempt two. Nose dive.
Attempt three. Nose dive.
While I checked MULTIPLE times the directions the control surfaces moved in relation to the controller.....I failed to notice the elevator was backwards. Oops.
Other than my pride,the power pod was the only casualty. Rather, THREE power pods were the only casualties. Getting good at making them however. The nose did take a bit of a beating, but a quick patch fixed it. The power pods were beyond repair.
Maybe the wind will settle and I can try again today.
 

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Hondo76251

Well-known member
Ouch! Is the plane ok? LOS?
Long story short... Yes, kind of

I was shooting gaps FPV and I was figuring I might crash so I used an old battery with a cell that had died. I got it charged up but as soon as you hear the plane power up you can hear the alarm go off (had it set to go off at 3.2) I was figuring the esc would shut off so I kept going... Turns out the receiver died first! LOL
 

Hoomi

Well-known member
Someday, I might reach the point where I laugh about my crashes, but I haven't gotten there yet. Yesterday, I went to put the Simple Scout up, and rolled right after lift-off. Minor damage, but after the Sensei crash last weekend, the frustration level was high and confidence low, so I ended up just packing up and going home.

I'm at work this morning, and if the weather today is anything like it's been for the last week or two, the winds will be kicking up strong by the time I get home.

It may be time to play around on the simulator a lot, before the next chance to head back out to the flying field.
 

mayan

Well-known member
Someday, I might reach the point where I laugh about my crashes, but I haven't gotten there yet. Yesterday, I went to put the Simple Scout up, and rolled right after lift-off. Minor damage, but after the Sensei crash last weekend, the frustration level was high and confidence low, so I ended up just packing up and going home.

I'm at work this morning, and if the weather today is anything like it's been for the last week or two, the winds will be kicking up strong by the time I get home.

It may be time to play around on the simulator a lot, before the next chance to head back out to the flying field.
@Hoomi don't get put down by crashes practice makes prefect.
 

Hondo76251

Well-known member
the frustration level was high and confidence low....

may be time to play around on the simulator a lot...
You reach the point of laughing by having so many catastrophic maydays under your belt that it no longer raises your blood pressure! You get there sooner than you think!

Dont have a pilots license yet, but ive had ultralight and a lot of "full scale" hours. One of the best lessons is, as my favorite instructor put it, "when they come to cut you out of the wreckage they better find you still pulling on the sticks..." Meaning, learn to fly through the crash, never stop flying... You'd be amazed at how many times you can pull it out at the last second, or at least minimize damage...

Ive got a simulator, its amazing for building your muscle memory. I highly recommend it for the days you cant fly due to weather... Lord knows I've logged 10hrs on the simulator to every hour I've flown this winter!

I know 60 bucks for a reciever in a scratch build seems like a lot but its hard to beat a spektrum with AS3x... And they will outlive many models in my experience... I fly mostly cheap receivers now, but I started with a few AS3x and it was worth it...
 

mrjdstewart

Well-known member
Someday, I might reach the point where I laugh about my crashes, but I haven't gotten there yet. Yesterday, I went to put the Simple Scout up, and rolled right after lift-off. Minor damage, but after the Sensei crash last weekend, the frustration level was high and confidence low, so I ended up just packing up and going home.

I'm at work this morning, and if the weather today is anything like it's been for the last week or two, the winds will be kicking up strong by the time I get home.

It may be time to play around on the simulator a lot, before the next chance to head back out to the flying field.

dude that stinks, that was a cool plane. i hope it is ok. i have to admit that i was surprised to see you show up so late yesterday. the later in the day the stronger the winds, the higher the heat, and just tougher to fly.

don't get frustrated. hang with it and keep flying. it's the only way it get easier...and even though i don't get "mad" when i crash now a days, i still hate it. it's not easy especially with an airplane you built that you really do like.

hang tough,

me :cool:
 

mayan

Well-known member
dude that stinks, that was a cool plane. i hope it is ok. i have to admit that i was surprised to see you show up so late yesterday. the later in the day the stronger the winds, the higher the heat, and just tougher to fly.

don't get frustrated. hang with it and keep flying. it's the only way it get easier...and even though i don't get "mad" when i crash now a days, i still hate it. it's not easy especially with an airplane you built that you really do like.

hang tough,

me :cool:
+1 on every word!
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
Someday, I might reach the point where I laugh about my crashes, but I haven't gotten there yet. Yesterday, I went to put the Simple Scout up, and rolled right after lift-off. Minor damage, but after the Sensei crash last weekend, the frustration level was high and confidence low, so I ended up just packing up and going home.

I'm at work this morning, and if the weather today is anything like it's been for the last week or two, the winds will be kicking up strong by the time I get home.

It may be time to play around on the simulator a lot, before the next chance to head back out to the flying field.
I know that crashes are confidence sapping but bear in mind that each of us has a certain number of crashes in our flying career. Each time you crash the number remaining is reduced by one.

If you are using a good radio system and well designed and built aircraft then eventually you will find that crashes are a distant memory or at least a very infrequent occurrence.

As I have recommended to other beginners, build multiple copies of your early/learning aircraft. Airtime is everything when learning to fly so by taking a number of the same plane when you go flying you can transfer bits after a crash and continue flying. I personally hated spending many hours getting prepared for a mornings flying only to have the plane become damaged either in transit or in the pit area. Try to maximise your time flying at the field and soon your crashes will fade into the past!

Have fun!
 

Hoomi

Well-known member
The plane just suffered minor damage - broken prop, a bit of wear on one wingtip, and a crack in the elevator that should be easy to fix. I already have a spare prop, from the 2 pack I ordered from FT.

I'm starting to think I need to take Launchpad McQuack out of the cockpit. The first flight with the Scout, before I put him in there, was the best one, and - well - anyone who watched the cartoon knows Launchpad was highly prone to crashes.

It's Launchpad's fault! Yeah! That's the ticket!
 
Took my repaired TT back out today. IT FLEW! First time ever. Then it slowed down. I noticed the motor dangling by the wires. Grrrr. Brought it in for a vigorous landing. FOUR trips back to the house and the field later for crash and repair, I flew it for 6-7 minutes. Freaking magical! Loved every minute of it. Just cruising, then I thought Id punch it to see what she would do. One of the sticks holding the pod had come out, the motor had came unglued, and the mounting screws were loose. BUT! IT FLEW! And, I made a nice soft landing. Glad I stuck with it and didnt stomp the plane to death. :)
One of the crashes today was epic. I lost the plane in the sun.(lesson learned) When I caught up with it it was behind a school, and headed to earth at a rapid rate of speed. Much to my surprise there was very little damage. I at least wish I could have seen it hit.
 

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mayan

Well-known member
I know that crashes are confidence sapping but bear in mind that each of us has a certain number of crashes in our flying career. Each time you crash the number remaining is reduced by one.

If you are using a good radio system and well designed and built aircraft then eventually you will find that crashes are a distant memory or at least a very infrequent occurrence.

As I have recommended to other beginners, build multiple copies of your early/learning aircraft. Airtime is everything when learning to fly so by taking a number of the same plane when you go flying you can transfer bits after a crash and continue flying. I personally hated spending many hours getting prepared for a mornings flying only to have the plane become damaged either in transit or in the pit area. Try to maximise your time flying at the field and soon your crashes will fade into the past!

Have fun!
+1

Took my repaired TT back out today. IT FLEW! First time ever. Then it slowed down. I noticed the motor dangling by the wires. Grrrr. Brought it in for a vigorous landing. FOUR trips back to the house and the field later for crash and repair, I flew it for 6-7 minutes. Freaking magical! Loved every minute of it. Just cruising, then I thought Id punch it to see what she would do. One of the sticks holding the pod had come out, the motor had came unglued, and the mounting screws were loose. BUT! IT FLEW! And, I made a nice soft landing. Glad I stuck with it and didnt stomp the plane to death. :)
One of the crashes today was epic. I lost the plane in the sun.(lesson learned) When I caught up with it it was behind a school, and headed to earth at a rapid rate of speed. Much to my surprise there was very little damage. I at least wish I could have seen it hit.
Great job @CPJ. Happy for you buddy. Ain't nothing like the first time. I remember mine as if it was yesterday, so happy :).