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3D Printed Quadcopter V 1.0

LitterBug

Troll Spammer
#22
FYI... I have designed, 3D printed, and flown something a little bit different (ok completely rediculous), but ignored all them maths: LitterBug's OctoUFO . Kinda seat of the pants, how can I cram 8 props on an 8 inch bed kinda thing. Would be willing to sacrifice some hardware to the cause in stress testing your design when you get to the point where it is flyable and can share .STL files. :-D

Cheers!
LitterBug
 
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#23
FYI... I have designed, 3D printed, and flown something a little bit different (ok completely rediculous), but ignored all them maths: LitterBug's OctoUFO . Kinda seat of the pants, how can I cram 8 props on an 8 inch bed kinda thing. Would be willing to sacrifice some hardware to the cause in stress testing your design when you get to the point where it is flyable and can share .STL files. :-D

Cheers!
LitterBug
;D a mini U.F.O. , it is so lovely XD
I'm doing some math in order to have some data and log about my building, and i'm waiting the parts....so i must do something...
 
#26
I think you can take abs 3d printed material and coat it in acetone and toss it in the oven. It apparently aligns the molecules or something. I do not know the term but I have heard it works and makes the abs Supa Strong. That might help you unless you already did it.
 

LitterBug

Troll Spammer
#27
Acetone is highly flammable. Tossing it in an oven is a REALLY REALLY BAD idea... =-O

There is some debate if acetone curing abs actually strengthens parts, but it definitely makes them shiny. This is something that must be done in a well ventilated location away from any heat/sparks. Here's a link to an example of curing ABS: https://airwolf3d.com/2013/11/26/7-steps-shiny-finish-on-abs-parts-acetone/

I have gear to do it, but haven't done it yet. Guess I should try it on the UFO before turning it over to Stefan at FFE...

Cheers!
LitterBug
 
#29
Acetone usually melt down the plastic in order to smooth the gap between the layer, that procedure does not work well on PLA, which is the material that I ve used for the frame
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
#30
Acetone is highly flammable. Tossing it in an oven is a REALLY REALLY BAD idea... =-O

There is some debate if acetone curing abs actually strengthens parts, but it definitely makes them shiny. This is something that must be done in a well ventilated location away from any heat/sparks. Here's a link to an example of curing ABS: https://airwolf3d.com/2013/11/26/7-steps-shiny-finish-on-abs-parts-acetone/

I have gear to do it, but haven't done it yet. Guess I should try it on the UFO before turning it over to Stefan at FFE...

Cheers!
LitterBug
HEHE that example of the acetone cured print looks like its made from strawberry licorice and looks tasty and very tempting to snack on.

I shall also second the motion to NOT put acetone treated plastic in your oven nor any where near high heat or open flame.
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
#34
You forget I was in the NAVY?

NEVER Again Volunteer Yourself.

But since you are doing the volunteering Id give it ago for a build. I suppose yer gonna make me learn Dronin as well huh hehe.
 
#36
Inquiring minds wunna know if there are any .stl files too... I want to print one for PsyBorg to build at FFE!
I don't know if this frame will be good with any kind of FCB or AIO ESC , i've bought CC3d , a PB and an Esc 4x1 , they have holes at the same distance , so now i can draw and print the support.
Do you really wanna try this frame?
 
#38
firstly hello to all and this'll be my first post to the forum so hopefully I dont step on any toes :D.

Liking the general design youve gone with there and as someone who primarily only fly's quads he's designed and created using 3d printing I'd like to offer up any advise or pointers I can give as you progress, to get the ball rolling Id like to offer my own opinion on some of the things youve encountered already.

<takes a deep breath>

firstly, when approaching 3d printed arm parts unlike CF frame arms the "load" test isnt really the most crucial point for the arms, yes they need to be able to withstand the overall weight that'll be thrown at them but you'll find with 3d printed parts its the sudden more instant forces that will catch you out, it sounds brutal (and tbf it actually is) but rather than loading up the part with weight its probably better to do a sudden impact test, even smacking them against table edge a couple of times can give you a general idea of whether the parts build and design will be good enough, if a couple of hard edge smacks can cause damage then I can guarantee you wont want to be relying on that part when its in the air:eek:

secondly, material!, lots of people who try the 3d printing approach will say "the stronger the material the better the frame", imho.... just not true, if you want a decent resulting frame you want to use a filament that has a nice mix of both strength and to a certain extent flexibility obviously not to much of the latter but just enough to help the frame absorb some of the torque stress it'll suffer during flight without snapping/shattering but at the sametime not flapping about like a jelly mold (btw Im a Brit so jelly for us is I think "jello" for you... Im also assuming most reading this are american?), on that point your on the right track using ABS over the more rigid options like Petg,Pla or even PolyCarb

third and final, someone mentioned acetone vaping somewhere, If your gonna stick with using ABS for your build then I can only say this, DEFINITELY acetone vape your parts, yes as someone mentioned it does make everything all shiny and smooth with ABS and though thats a added plus (atleast visually) by far the greatest benefit to acetone vaping ABS parts is the increased strength it adds in, especially in terms of dealing with torque stress's, to clear up some of the misconceptions voiced, its not really anything to do with "chemically altering the parts" or "causing the layers to bond better", If done right the vaping will only effect the outer 1-2 perimeter skin of your parts and what it'll do is in basic terms melt the skin of your part which in turn will make the skin one solid layer rather than a series of layers stacked on top of each other, the interior infill layering will not be effected, also though some will advise that you can simply "brush your part with acetone" or even "dip" it..... thats sooooooooo not a good idea, you'll get uneven skin thickness with brushing on acetone (and create weak spots throughout the part) as for "dipping", you'll likely end up with a pool of melted plastic in whatever colour your part used to be:confused:. In conclusion, IF you go with Acetone treating you parts (I recommend) then do a bit of research into how you wanna go about "vaping" it (theres a cold and hot method) and only do it via vaping the acetone, not brushing and definitely not dipping.

well Ive probably prattled on a little to much and way to much for a first post but I like seeing other going down the 3d printed frame route so I hope some of what Ive said is of some help atleast
 
#39
Ok, I found an issue while i was building the copter while i was tightening the motor's screws, there is not clearence between the rotor and arm, so once the screws are locked the rotor does not spin free anymore.
I've draw bigger the motor housing and I'am currently printing 4 new arms.
:p
 

JimCR120

Got Lobstah?
Site Moderator
#40
Shawdreamer,
A hearty , welcome aboard to you, sir. It would seem you know a thing or two about the hobby and have hit the deck running with kind and detailed advice. Would you care to share some more about yourself (where you are from, how long you've been in the hobby, particular interests/builds)?

Welcome to the forum.
—Jim