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Pumpkin drop event

An invitation to multirotor discourse!

#1
With so many choices to choose from, I was wondering what you guys look for personally when buying a multirotor.

Do you prefer a kit or a ready-to-fly?
Or just the frame or maybe a PNF?
Perhaps you prefer to scratch build?

Does it have to look good aesthetically? Or do you utilitarians not care at all what it looks like, just what it does?

What kind of flight times and payloads are you after?

Tri, quad, hex, v-tail, y6, octo even dragonfly ?

Does it have to be geared towards AP, racing, or FPV?
Maybe it needs to do a little bit of everything?

dji over everything??

After discussing this topic extensively with friends, we came up with a tentative list of what we look for and it goes as follows:

1. Affordable - Ready-to-fly under $500. PNF under $350 and kit under $75

2. Easy to build - Quick and simple. Everything you need in one kit.

3. Easy to fly - Enjoyable and versatile.

4. Easy to fix - Having the ability to make most repairs at the field.

5. Easy to expand - Adding and subtracting features should be a no-brainer.

What do you guys(or gals) think? In your opinion, what kit "has it all"?
Or if a kit were to "have it all," what would those features include?
 

RAM

Posted a thousand or more times
#2
What I would like to see is the absolute smallest multirotor camera platform that works. I want stable video. I assume fpv since it will be so small I won't be able to tell direction of flight from a short distance. I want to lift a prosumer digital camera not a gopro. Flight times can be short but battery swap must be fast and easy (I think too many people strive for longer flight times but forget that when they edit they are only using short clips strung together). I want very precise hover (I'm even considering a dirigible styled multirotor instead of a gimbal). I want the fpv to by my framing viewfinder or better yet, the main camera if possible. I want enough control over the camera to select video, stills, time lapse and zoom. I want my motors and props matched to a complementary vibration frequency for my video settings. All for the low price of $19.99 with free shipping. :)
 

degriz

Active member
#3
I am just starting to look into this part of flying, only doing fixed wing for many years. I would like to know some answers to your questions as well.

Seems a bit overwhelming to a noob
 
#4
Do you prefer a kit or a ready-to-fly?

I think rtf is good for getting started learning to fly. One thing that I think makes it hard is that there are so many possible combinations o parts so on some level there is a fear of making a bad choice or getting the wrong combination of things. Now that I am a bit more confident and have learned more (especially from the people on this forum) I am more comfortable building my own.

Or just the frame or maybe a PNF?
Perhaps you prefer to scratch build?

Have scratch built, but really buying a frame is really convenient.

Does it have to look good aesthetically? Or do you utilitarians not care at all what it looks like, just what it does?

Looks are cool, and usually have some purpose. Nicely routed wires or carefully placed components make for better builds with fewer problems.

What kind of flight times and payloads are you after?

For me... more than 5 minutes per pack, and the ability to fly for at least 1 hour total...

Tri, quad, hex, v-tail, y6, octo even dragonfly ?

I have three quads and a hex at this point.

Does it have to be geared towards AP, racing, or FPV?
Maybe it needs to do a little bit of everything?

Different quads for different situations. I have a 250 for flying fast and a phantom for photography.

dji over everything??

I do like my phantom. Really I like things that work. Y scratch builds use naza-m kites, and that really comes down to prior experience.

Can't wait to see what everyone else thinks.

Db
 

cranialrectosis

Faster than a speeding faceplant!
Mentor
#5
Copters are like screwdrivers. You need the right one for the job or you are wasting time and money.

I have several copters for different applications because sometimes you need a jeweller's 1/32" blade and sometimes you need a 1/4" Phillips and trying to make one do the job of the other is just a waste of time.

The question isn't what makes the best copter. The question is what do you want to do with a copter.
 

narcolepticltd

I unbuild stuff regularly
#6
Copters are like screwdrivers. You need the right one for the job or you are wasting time and money.

I have several copters for different applications because sometimes you need a jeweller's 1/32" blade and sometimes you need a 1/4" Phillips and trying to make one do the job of the other is just a waste of time.

The question isn't what makes the best copter. The question is what do you want to do with a copter.
+1 to this here ^^ :)

As far as RTF stuff goes, the immersionrc vortex will check off a lot of those boxes (assuming you already have a decent tx and fpv gear). You'd be hard pressed to build something of the same quality and features at the same price point (and it can be modified a bit once you feel the need).

If you're not wanting to jump right into FPV, but still just want a fun platform for acrobatics, you'll have to build but a 230 warpquad with the recommended setup is a blast to fly.
 

razor02097

Rogue Drone Pilot
#7
I do not see myself buying an RTF multi-rotor unless it is something I can't build in a practical way. The Blade Nano QX FPV is a perfect example. I could not build a mulit-rotor of that size at that price.

I think DJI has some really really cool stuff. But I don't really think their product is a fit for my needs. The phantom models specs are pretty amazing right out of the box. However I hate the controller and the migration toward mandatory firmware updates scares me a little.

But all of that is my opinion. I would choose to build a multi-rotor everytime just on the notion that I enjoy building them.
 

Cyberdactyl

Misfit Multirotor Monkey
#8
I agree with razor, in that I think building from scratch is the way to go, but I started before you could whip out plastic and be flying in an hour. Plus it makes you intimately familiar with your MR. That can be a good thing or bad in that you might find yourself attempting to forever improve on a build when you should be flying it. :rolleyes: However, I also fully understand some may not have the tools or the place to do a DYI, let alone the skills.

But the point about which MR is best, is the one that suits your needs, at a clear-headed reasonable budget, is the bottom line.