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donalson

Active member
#81
Vids where exactly what we needed... as mentioned the rudder is reversed... also plugging into the aileron channel will make flying motor natural
 

mayan

Legendary member
#83
So after some rest from my night shift. I found a moment to edit the footage that my friend filmed with his spark drone. Special thanks to Ben Sher for filming this practice session. Thank to you, everybody for you inputs, comments, feedbacks, and guidance. I feel that I am getting better very practice thanks to you.

Taking your advice, I did end up change the rudder to the aileron switch on the receiver flying with throttle on the left stick and rudder and elevator on the right one.

Here are these session practice video: 07-09-2018 TT Practice Session

;) Don't think that at this point I need to mention or say that your inputs, comments, feedbacks, and guidance are welcome.
 
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mayan

Legendary member
#87
Looks like it might be tail heavy from how it pitches up on the vid
I don’t think so. But I might be wrong. Have to mention that it's super windy ... maybe that’s what was causing the climb so high with the tail back.
 
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Arcfyre

Elite member
#88
You are getting some longer flights, and it seems like you are consistently making the correct control inputs. As always, some observations from the video:

There is something off about the behavior of your airplane. It climbs too steeply when thrown and stalls right away. Double check the following things very carefully:

-That the CG with the battery in (ready to fly) is correct, and set up to give you a slight nose heavy setting.

-That your elevator, when in the neutral position, is exactly straight, and not angled upwards, and similarly that your elevator trim is centered. Check this with the battery in and the controller powered on.

-That you have some downward thrust angle included in your power pod. This is most easily done by adding a small spacer between the motor and firewall at the topmost mounting screw. If you have any leftover motor shaft adapters (they come with the props usually) they make good spacers. Down thrust is necessary to balance out your high lift airfoil.

As you said, it looks very windy. I can see trees in the background swaying, and your friend's shirt is flapping in the wind. You may have better luck flying in calmer conditions. That being said, if you do choose to fly in strong winds with a slow flier like the TT, may I suggest that you keep the plane flying into the wind as much as possible. Try a shallower launch angle, more towards the horizon, and less up. With as much wind as you have blowing, the plane will easily catch enough air to fly, and if you throw it at a shallower angle, it wont pitch up as much. Once you have your hands on the sticks, do your best to keep it pointed into the wind, and try not to let it turn and blow away from you.

You are doing well, I can see definite improvement since your first few videos. As always, I'm looking forward to seeing your next practice session.
 

mayan

Legendary member
#89
Thanks for the inputs will be going over your inputs again before the next practice session.

While I am rebuilding the fuselage and power pod nose since I trashed completely after my last flying session I have a question.

find hard to connect the push rush to the servos felling that the holes are to small compared to the push rod diameter. I am using 3.7g servos with a 0.8mm push rod.
Any ideas what I am doing wrong?
 

Arcfyre

Elite member
#90
3.7g servos are mighty small. I'm not surprised the pushrods don't fit well. Your best bet is to take a drill bit of the same diameter as your pushrods, and gently enlarge the hole on the control arm of the servo. Do this by hand, holding the drill bit between your fingers and turning it slowly.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#91
Thanks for the inputs will be going over your inputs again before the next practice session.

While I am rebuilding the fuselage and power pod nose since I trashed completely after my last flying session I have a question.



Any ideas what I am doing wrong?
It might be a silly suggestion but I have used many 3.7gram servos in a variety of different models. What I use for pushrods is simply straightened paperclips. They are more than strong enough, easy to tune using fixed rods with adjustment bends, and in the event of a crash often soft enough to bend rather than strip the servo gears!

They are cheap and are available in a variety of sizes and diameters! Some are even plastic coated in various colours!

Just what works for me!

have fun!
 

mayan

Legendary member
#92
Since yesterday was New Year’s Eve and today is New Year’s Day I don’t have time for a long build process. Like rebuilding the entire fuselage and power pod nose of the TT, so I decided to fix the Simple Cub. Considering I have the electronics and only had to make a few minor fixes, and most of which was mounting of the electronics.

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Question:
Considering that we are getting closer to the winter here and the days are getting windy I am finding myself having a hard time practicing with the TT because it’s hard to fly it against the wind. In one of my practice session I realized the plane what’s litterly hanging in place trying fight the wind. Do you think, that the Simple Cub has a better chance of fighting the wind and still be suitable to serve as a trainer plane?

I’ll still rebuild the TT cause it’s a great trainer plane, which I’d recommend to everyone. Hopefully I’ll be able to get it rebuilt tonight during my night shift :).
 

mayan

Legendary member
#93
It might be a silly suggestion but I have used many 3.7gram servos in a variety of different models. What I use for pushrods is simply straightened paperclips. They are more than strong enough, easy to tune using fixed rods with adjustment bends, and in the event of a crash often soft enough to bend rather than strip the servo gears!

They are cheap and are available in a variety of sizes and diameters! Some are even plastic coated in various colours!

Just what works for me!

have fun!
Do you have a picture I can look at to get a vision of what I am after?
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#94
Do you have a picture I can look at to get a vision of what I am after?
The tail section of this build in progress shows the straightened paperclips fitted between 3.7Gram servos and the linkage stoppers in the control horns.

Currently the build is soon to resume as the planes I was making to order have been delivered and My 3D printer has been assembled prior to testing.

have fun!
 

Arcfyre

Elite member
#95
In my personal opinion, the cub is not a great trainer airplane. I've built two, and both of them were difficult to fly. You may have better luck, but that was my experience.

If you have the time and ability, I would recommend trying out a versa wing. They are simple to build and only require 2 servos. The wingspan is about 950mm so they aren't that large either. It should be easy to fly with the electronics you have, in fact you could reuse the power pod from your cub. As an added bonus, flying wings tolerate windy conditions better than conventional airplanes and are quite durable when they crash.

As always, have fun and good luck!
 

mayan

Legendary member
#96
In my personal opinion, the cub is not a great trainer airplane. I've built two, and both of them were difficult to fly. You may have better luck, but that was my experience.

If you have the time and ability, I would recommend trying out a versa wing. They are simple to build and only require 2 servos. The wingspan is about 950mm so they aren't that large either. It should be easy to fly with the electronics you have, in fact you could reuse the power pod from your cub. As an added bonus, flying wings tolerate windy conditions better than conventional airplanes and are quite durable when they crash.

As always, have fun and good luck!
I’ll try it what’s the worse that can happen?
I thought about building the mini arrow which is similar to the versa wing. What’s the difference between them and which is more recommend for a newbie?
 

Arcfyre

Elite member
#97
The Arrow is smaller than the Versa wing and if memory serves it can only be built as a pusher (where the propeller is in the back). The Versa Wing can be built as either configuration. I recommended the Versa Wing to you so that you could just reuse the power pod you already have. The Versa flies beautifully in a tractor configuration, and it would make the build process very quick and easy.
 

rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
#98
An advantage to building either of the flying wing designs next is they both handle winds better than the traditional high wing on a square fuselage style. :D
 
#99
I also have a tiny trainer set up with the same wing you are using (the one without the ailerons). Mine is also tail heavy. I literally taped two quarters up front as close to the motor as possible which helped a ton.

I also had to set up low rates using the gage on the plans. I started out with full rates and was crashing a lot because I was over controlling the plane.
 

cranialrectosis

Faster than a speeding face plant!
Mentor
I'm with Arcfyre again on this. When you throw a TT into this much wind, you don't want so much pitch.

The TT has a ton of wing. You don't want/need so much up pitch when you launch. The plane is stalling at the top of the throw before you can gain control of it. You are launching at 45-50 degrees up pitch. Try 5 or 10 degrees with this much wing into this much wind.

You cannot fight the wind. You will lose every time. The wind is your dance partner, not your adversary. Don't wrestle with her by trying to heave your plane into the air. A gentle almost level nudge into the wind should do as is is your dance partner's job to lift you. The TT wings are designed to give the wind all the area it needs to lift you into the air with level flight. There is no need to try to launch the TT like a rocket at a 45 degree angle into even a light 5mph (8kph) breeze.


Is your lipo strapped down? I also see some characteristics of a tail heavy plane. Is your lipo sliding back towards the tail when you launch?.

Tail heavy planes are impossible to fly.

I recommend a balance test on video and let the forum help out.

Make a well lit, high def video of you balancing that plane on a chair back. Be sure the plane is ready to fly with a lipo in the bird just as it would be when you launch. Let the video clearly show the balance point on that plane so we can get some expert eyes on it (arcfyre and Hai-Lee types).